We Tried It: Pink-Fleshed Pineapples

The blushing Pinkglow pineapple has finally made its debut after 16 years of development—and it was worth the wait.
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I kind of go bananas for all things pineapple, and I'm definitely a fan of pink things, so when I heard one of my favorite fruits was getting a makeover, I was all ears. Last month, after 16 years of development, a pink-fleshed pineapple known as the Pinkglow made it to market.

Pineapples have long been a symbol of luxury and hospitality (starting back when Cristopher Columbus brought the rare, expensive fruit to Spain from South America), and this pink variety of the fruit upheld that tradition. My Pinkglow’s arrival was nothing short of luxurious. It came snugly packaged in a beautifully decorated cardboard box marked “Precious Cargo Costa Rica.” The inside of the box was a celebratory pink and yellow, announcing that my “Jewel of the Jungle” had arrived.

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And arrived it had. I felt like I was viewing it through a filter with its bold green and yellow exterior. When I removed it from the box, I noticed it had already had a haircut—its leafy green top was gone. When pineapples are hand-picked, their crowns are removed so they can be replanted to cultivate the next crop sustainably.  

I cut the fruit open to reveal the surprising flesh inside—a pale pink-salmon color that contrasted beautifully with the green and yellow exterior. I immediately thought about how striking it would look to layer pink pineapple slices on a platter with their yellow-fleshed cousins. Instaworthy with no prep! 

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Upon taking a bite, the first thing I noticed was just how juicy this fruit was. I mean, pineapples always are, but this one left me with juice dripping down my chin like I forgot how to eat. The flavor was mild at first, much less acidic than a traditional pineapple. But then a burst of cotton candy-like sweetness washed over my mouth. The sweetness never lingered or overwhelmed. I found the pineapple refreshing and sunshine-y—a totally enjoyable eating experience.

Although not as expensive as the rare pineapples of the Christopher Columbus days, at $49 the Pinkglow is still a luxury item. The high cost is due to limited production, a 24-month sustainable growth period and shipment directly from Costa Rica. With its fabulous colors, it's certainly a special treat to display on the 'gram or at a gathering with loved ones. 

Want to try one? Purchase online at pinkglowpineapple.com