Wisconsin’s Rush Creek Reserve delivers a decadent, cheesy texture with subtle flavors of the season

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Uplands Cheese
| Credit: Uplands Cheese

Hold onto your charcuterie boards. There's a new cheese begging to be at the center of your holiday table: Rush Creek Reserve from Wisconsin's Upland Cheese. The cheese, which is similar to Brie or Camembert, looks and tastes just like Christmas, and it might become your new favorite charcuterie selection. 

Presented wrapped in the bark of a spruce tree, the Rush Creek Reserve makes a beautiful addition to the holiday table based on looks alone. The rustic tree bark surrounding the thick heart of pudding-like cheese resembles the cross-section of a festive holiday log, adding instant cheer to your table. But the cheer doesn't end there. 

The cheese also tastes fabulously festive. The gentle essences of this raw cow's milk cheese unfold slowly, providing a sophisticated flavor. What takes it from good to great is that bark exterior: Grassy and smooth with a hint of smokiness, it imparts a touch of piney woodsiness that tastes magical—yes, tastes magical. Every bite comes with a wisp of festive flavor. 

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Credit: Tara Cox

The super-soft cheese is best served at room temperature or slightly warmed in the oven to make the most of the melty consistency and subtle flavors. Remove the top rind to reveal an absolutely decadent texture, then eat it with a spoon or dip your favorite crackers and fruit (we recommend apples and figs) right into its fondue-y goodness. Pair with a dry white wine for a treat that truly shines. 

Rush Creek Reserve is produced only in the fall—that's when the Upland Cheese cows change over from a summer grass diet to a fall hay diet, which yields a richer, more luxurious milk and, therefore, a more luxurious cheese. At $35 per wheel, it's an affordable luxury, but it's only available for a limited time, from November to January. Don't miss your chance to try this special Christmas cheese! 

To purchase, visit uplandcheese.com