It's the Bombe!

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What does a “women’s” food magazine look like nowadays? While some of our readers might say “Every Day with Rachael Ray,” there’s a new(ish) mag in town devoted exclusively to celebrating women and the food that they make (and love). It’s called Cherry Bombe, if you haven’t heard of it, and this past weekend the magazine came to life in New York City at its first ever conference, deliciously called “The Cherry Bombe Jubilee.”

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Photo courtesy of Cherry Bombe

The day-long event attracted all-stars from the culinary world (Alice Waters, Ruth Reichl, Marion Nestle, plus plenty of others), as well as inspiring ladies from other walks of professional life—makeup maven Bobbi Brown shared her cosmetics success story; Laurie David, producer of An Inconvenient Truth, promoted Fed Up, her upcoming film on the link between sugar and obesity.

Cherry Bombe’s founders, Claudia Wu and Kerry Diamond (who also starred in our April Southern brunch feature), curated panels that ran the gamut from food politics to entrepreneurship, and real talk prevailed. Gabrielle Hamilton of Prune in New York City and the Los Angeles restaurateur Suzanne Goin had a frank (and at times grim) appraisal of what it means to juggle motherhood and have a restaurant. Goin fought back tears when she recounted a story of her son telling his babysitter, “Some kids don’t have nannies, they have moms.” (Did we mention that the moderator, Bon Appétit’s Christine Muhlke, had her own toddler in her lap for much of the interview?!)

Challenges were identified, to be sure (“maybe we should change the model for what we consider success for women in food,” suggested former Gourmet editor Ruth Reichl in response to recent cries of inequality in the kitchen). But mostly, the discussions were encouraging for attendees, many of whom represented different parts of the food world today—cooking, academics, business ownership, farming, writing and more—and most of whom were women. “At 25 I didn’t actually know I could have a career in food,” said Reichl in a closing interview. And we all know how that turned out. If things have changed so dramatically since Reichl was 25, then think how much more they can change in the years ahead? To be discussed, perhaps, at next year’s Jubilee.

—Gabriella Gershenson