The Pastry School Diaries: Patience is a Virtue

Publish date:
Social count:

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Pastry & Baking Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences! 

To this day, I am continually asked the question, "why pastry—why not culinary?" My go-to response is something along the lines of, "I've always wanted to delve deeper into the world of pastry arts. Since there is such a science behind it, I know I would benefit and learn more at pastry school than at culinary school. Besides, I don't have the patience to learn how to chiffonade basil, dice an onion or poach an egg—I do that all the time at home already!"

Want to know what else I don't have the patience for? Building, frosting and decorating a perfect cake.

We've transitioned from baking rustic desserts like crumb cake and muffins to more detail-oriented techniques: using a serrated knife to create a perfectly flat and round cake; Frosting in even layers that conceal any cake or crumbs; Piping perfect shells and rosettes around the edges to make a bakery-quality confection. As I'm getting my first taste (figuratively and literally!) of what our final project will be (creating a three-tiered celebration cake), I'm truly beginning to understand that patience is a virtue. Every step must be taken in a slow, methodical manner—you absolutely cannot rush the process. If you slice off too much of your cake, there's not much you can do to remedy it, and while frosting can be spread and piped over again, there's no hope in getting those little stray crumbs out (a cake baker's worst nightmare).

So as I'm learning from my mistakes and trying new things, I'm thankful for this opportunity of trial and error. Am I set out to be the next Duff Goldman? Probably not. But I'm looking forward to seeing my skills in the cake department improve.

Check back next week for more pastry school fun!