4 Smart Tips for Decorating a Kid's Bedroom

Design the bedroom of your tween or teen's dreams with these cheap and cheerful ideas from Michael Murray of Rachael Ray Home.
By Danielle Blundell ,

Panel Bed (Full) from the Rachael Ray Home Hudson Collection

Courtesy of Rachael Ray Home

Michael Murray, Rachael's design partner on Rachael Ray Home, has tons of kids room decorating tricks up his sleeves. Some of his biggest tips include buying furniture built to last and choosing pieces that are sophisticated enough to work into adulthood. Here, Michael shares a few more ideas on how to stretch those decorating dollars in a child's bedroom.

Tip 1: Break out the paint

A coat of paint can really reinvent a room—and hide imperfections in older homes. Flat is usually the most forgiving finish, but Michael likes to conceal flaws by sponge-painting a high gloss clear paint over flat-finished walls.

Tip 2: See the light

Add a fun lighting fixture for a focal point in the room. “Rachael likes a big statement fixture in the middle of the room,” says Michael. Something large and shiny can also draw attention away from dated carpeting or other things you are unable to change due to budget.

Tip 3: Upgrade the window treatments

Blinds and shades are great for privacy, but don’t forget drapery panels as well. Curtains and wall coverings add a finished look, and depending on how you mount them, they can make a room feel taller and loftier. Michael likes sticking with a neutral like white, which goes with everything, even if you switch up bedding in a year.

Tip 4: Get artsy

Use art for a dose of personality in a space. Pieces don’t have to break the bank though. All you need, says Michael, is cheap stock frames with something DIY in them. Try a photograph, drawing, or even a favorite magazine ad. “Celebrate the colors in the room [with whatever you pick or make],” says Michael. He suggests painting a watercolor picture or abstract canvas. “That’s something really personal you can do at home, and it can make the young person that lives in the room feel like they’re engaged in the room.”

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