How to Speak Wine

There's a little-known law of economics in the wine industry: The harder a wine is to pronounce, the better value it is. Stores can charge a premium for familiar old friends like chardonnay and merlot, but tongue twisters are a tough sell, so they're often priced to move. Practice saying these! You'll impress your friends and save a few bucks while you're at it.
speak wine

Gewurztraminer

SAY IT Guh-VURTS-trah-mee-ner

Even wine snobs argue over the correct pronunciation (some swear it's guh-vurts-TRAH-min-er), so play it safe and just call the tasty white by its nickname, "Guh-VURTS." This full-bodied bottle makes fast friends with spicy takeout.

Agiorgitiko

SAY IT Ah-yor-YEE-tee-koh

This name could stump even a U.N. translator, but if you work your way through all five syllables, you'll be rewarded with a deliciously aromatic, plummy red charmer from Greece's Peloponnese region.

Dolcetto

SAY IT Dol-CHET-toe

No need to consult an Italian speaker. Just think ch-ch-chcheap when you see the label. Dolcetto delivers great fruit flavor, floral aromas and low tannins, all of which justify the name: "little sweet one."

Vinho Verde

SAY IT GROO-ner FELT-lee-ner

When you ask for this Austrian white (in a toothy Schwarzenegger accent, of course), you'll get a mouthful in return: a bright, lip-smacking white with hints of grapefruit and a dash of white pepper.

Gruner Veltliner

SAY IT GROO-ner FELT-lee-ner

When you ask for this Austrian white (in a toothy Schwarzenegger accent, of course), you'll get a mouthful in return: a bright, lip-smacking white with hints of grapefruit and a dash of white pepper.

Chinon

SAY IT She-NOHN

A delicious stand-in for pricy pinot noir, this light red is made from the cabernet franc grape, and its acidity makes it a great match for seafood. You'll sound like a French aristocrat ordering it.

 

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