Lauren Purcell

Lauren Purcell’s Favorite Hors d’Oeuvres Recipes

In the January/February issue of Every Day with Rachael Ray, our editor-in-chief Lauren Purcell dishes about all things dinner parties. “I’m deeply fond of theme parties,” she says, “But somehow, my theme-mania never translated to dinner parties. Until now!”

 

 

As the Queen of Cocktail Parties (she did write her own cookbook on the subject, in fact), it only makes sense that the first party Lauren wants to throw in the new year is an hors d’Oeuvres party: a small (and seated) group so everyone can be in on the same conversations, plus the festive feel you get from having a bite of this, a taste of that. Check out her three recipe picks below!

 

Goat Cheese and Leek Croustades

 

Ingredients

For the croustade cups

36 slices high-quality white sandwich bread

4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter, melted

 

For the filling

1 tablespoon butter

1 cup finely chopped leeks, white and pale green parts (about 2 medium leeks)

8 ounces soft mild goat cheese

3 tablespoons plain yogurt

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped chives

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1/4 cup pine nuts

 

Directions

Prepare the cups

Preheat oven to 350°F.

With a 2 1/2-inch round cookie cutter, cut out a round of bread from each slice. Brush one side of each round with the melted butter. Press the bread, butter side down, into the cup of a mini muffin tin. The bread will not reach the top of the cups.

Bake until the top edges are browned, 11 to 13 minutes. Remove the croustades to a wire rack to cool.

 

Prepare the filling

In a large saucepan, melt the butter over low to medium heat. Add the leeks and sauté, stirring frequently, until softened, 8 to 10 minutes. If the leeks begin to brown, lower the heat.

In a food processor, blend the goat cheese, olive oil, yogurt, chives, parsley, salt, and pepper until smooth. Transfer to a bowl and stir in leeks. Set aside.

Toast the pine nuts in a small pan over medium heat, shaking frequently, until lightly browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Set aside.

Return the croustade cups to the muffin tins and fill each cup with goat cheese mixture. Top with 3 to 4 pine nuts. Bake for about 5 minutes.

Makes 36 croustades.

 

 

Shrimp with Spicy Lime Dip

 

Ingredients

For the shrimp

1 pound medium shrimp

2 garlic cloves, crushed

 

For the spicy lime dip

1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup sour cream
3 scallions, thinly sliced (white and pale green parts)
2 medium garlic cloves, minced
3 small chipotle chiles in adobo, minced to a paste, plus 1/2 teaspoon adobo sauce
1 teaspoon grated lime zest plus 1 tablespoon juice (1 lime)

 

Directions

Prepare the shrimp

Peel the shrimp and devein them, if desired. Put the garlic in a pot of generously salted water and bring water to a boil. Put shrimp in and cook until they’re pink and cooked through, about 3 minutes. (The water may not return to a boil in that time.) Chill in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

 

Prepare the dip

Prepare the dip: Mix all the ingredients in a small bowl until smooth and creamy. Refrigerate at least 1 hour. Makes 40 to 50 shrimp and 1 1/2 cups of dip

 

 

 

Moroccan Lamb Meatballs with Dill Sauce

 

Ingredients

For the meatballs

1/3 cup minced onion
1 garlic clove, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried mint, crumbled
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pound ground lamb
1 cup fine fresh bread crumbs (about 2 slices white bread, ground in food processor)
1 egg, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons finely chopped dried cranberries
1/4 cup white sesame seeds

 

For the sauce

1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup chopped fresh dill
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
ground white pepper to taste

 

Directions

Prepare the sauce

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl.

 

Prepare the meatballs

Preheat oven to 450°F.

In a small, nonstick skillet, cook the onion and garlic in the olive oil over moderately low heat, stirring, until softened but not browned, 8 to 10 minutes. Scrape the mixture into a big bowl. Stir in the salt, mint, allspice, and cinnamon. Add the lamb, bread crumbs, egg, cranberries, and sesame seeds and combine thoroughly (the easiest way is to use your hands).

Roll the mixture into 1 1/4-inch balls. (Guests will be spearing them with toothpicks, so they should be no bigger than two bites’ worth.) Line up the meatballs on an ungreased baking sheet as you go (they can be close, just not touching). Bake just until no longer pink in the middle, 8 to 10 minutes.

Serve with the dill sauce alongside.

Makes about 32 meatballs and 1 1/4 cups sauce.

 

 

For more of Lauren’s recipes, visit her website here.

From Our Editor-in-Chief: Lists I Live By

 

 

Weekends are so 2009! Cinco de Mayo falls on a Monday (excuse me, lunes) this year, and that plays right into my margarita-mixing, tortilla-chip- dipping hands—because Monday is one of my favorite nights to entertain. For one thing, it makes scheduling a snap. Finding a weekend night when four or five friends are all available? Forget it. It seems the later in the week a get-together is scheduled, the more likely people are to cancel as the snowball of obligations threatens to roll over them. But on Monday nights, everyone seems to be free! Even more importantly, Mondays have a built-in low-key vibe—you’re practically prohibited from making a fuss. Here are my three relax-the-rules rules.

 

 

1. No Elaborate Hors D’Oeuvres

On Mondays, pre-dinner nibbles are anything I can pour directly from a bag, box or jar into a bowl, or unwrap and plunk on a plate: olives, fancy potato chips, cheese and crackers, salted nuts. For a Cinco de Mayo party, the classic is also a crowd-pleaser. Chips and salsa coming right up!

 

2. Serve a Make-Ahead Main Course

The beauty of Monday is it comes right after Sunday, a day I actually do have time to cook. The goal is to make a one-dish meal, like chili or chicken enchiladas, that I can simply heat up the next night when everybody arrives. That way, it’s no big deal if I race home from work at 6:45 and guests are due at 7.

 

3. Put Someone Else on Dessert Duty

I remind whoever it is that we’re on the no-shame-for-store-bought plan. If she gets the urge to bake brownies, fantastic. But if she wants to swing by the store for a few pints of ice cream? Make mine chocolate-chocolate chip, please!

 

My Margarita Musts:

 

1. A salt rim.

I’m easygoing about rocks versus no rocks—ice changes a cocktail’s strength, not its taste. But salt is mandatory to brighten and balance a margarita’s sweet-sour flavors.

 

2. Mid-shelf tequila.

Save the smooth, aged, expensive tequila for sipping on its own. Margaritas are best when they’re a little rough around the edges

 

3. Fresh lime juice.

You’re forgiven if you like your margaritas no-salt, top-shelf or served in a plastic tumbler shaped like a saguaro cactus, but back away from the bottled lime juice. If that’s all you’ve got, switch to beer!

 
 

Related Links

The Relieved Renovator

We Can Work it Out!

What I Ate Last Night

Weekend Bites: The 2014 Charleston Wine + Food Festival

It’s that time of the year again: Time for the BB&T Charleston Wine + Food Festival! Each year, the culinary excellence and culture of Charleston is celebrated during a weekend-long festival around the city. The extensive guest list includes some of the most locally and nationally renowned chefs, personalities, authors, pitmasters, farmers, drink masters and more. This year, Every Day with Rachael Ray will be a media sponsor and host two culinary events: A Sandwich Showcase and At Home with Celebrity Tastemakers, where guests can meet the celebrity chefs and authors behind some of the year’s hottest cookbooks, and sample some of their brand new recipes. As usual, our Editor-in-Chief, Lauren Purcell, will be attending the events, so be sure to check out her coverage on her Twitter and Instagram.

 

Will you be in Charleston over the weekend? You can still attend the events! Click here to buy tickets for the Sandwich Showcase and here to buy tickets for the Celebrity Tastemakers event.

 

And just to get you excited, here are a few of Lauren’s pics from last year’s festival!

 

Lauren helps NYC celebrity chef April Bloomfield break down a pig

 

Enjoying a fabulous lunch at Husk Restaurant

 

Letting the pros at Xiao Bao Biscuit choose dinner

 

Slurping down local oysters at The Ordinary

 

Starting the morning off with a Bloody Mary from The Grocery

 

 

 

Related Links

The Ultimate Scrambled Eggs

Burger Battle Roayle: The Best of the Southeast

America’s Best Doughnuts

The Relieved Renovator

Now that our editor-in-chief, Lauren Purcell, is finally done with her kitchen renovation, she’s sharing her thoughts on what she would do differently next time.

Did This

 

1. Took a Vacation

During the dustiest, loudest, most disruptive phase of the renovation–the demolition of the old kitchen–I was at the beach. Smart move.

 

2. Relied on Expert Advice

Luckily for me, my designer understood my insane schedule, and for most big design decisions, she presented me with a carefully curated array of options (five paint colors, not 25), so I could make choices quickly.

 

3. Listed My Major Must-Haves

For instance, I clearly articulated my ideal appliance layout (fridge and range on the same wall); cabinet configuration (floor to ceiling); and flooring (cork). That helped streamline the process.

 

Shoulda Done This, Too

 

1. Planned Another Getaway Six Weeks Later

That’s around the time I really hit my limit on living in my bedroom on toaster-oven cuisine and takeout Thai. By the time I was able to  emerge from my lady-cave, I was almost too cooped-up and cranky to appreciate the beautiful new space.

 

2. Picked a Few Details to Focus On

Making choices from a limited selection was definitely efficient. But as it turns out, the aspects I love most about my new kitchen are the ones I got more involved with–like the ceiling fixture, which I picked out after a long, enjoyable afternoon at the lighting showroom. In retrospect, I wish I had done the same with a few other items. I think I’d love my backsplash even more if the tile felt like my personal discovery.

 

3. Mentioned the Little Stuff

What I didn’t communicate very well were some of the details that make a big difference in my day-to-day. All my lights are on dimmers (big request), but the switches themselves aren’t the kind I prefer–too fiddly. of course, they’re easily changed. But next time, I’ll remember to bring up anything I’m opinionated about, not just the biggies. Wait! Did I just commit in writing to a next time?

Lauren Purcell on @NowThisFood!

Throughout the month of November, our editor-in-chief, Lauren Purcell, will be sharing Thanksgiving tips on the food section of NowThis News, as well as their instagram, @NowThisFood. Turkey tips in 15 seconds? It doesn’t get much easier than that–or more fun! Check out the intro video here on our Instagram and watch the first video on @NowThisFood, where Lauren explains how to roast a turkey without a rack!

Related Links

Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes

Thanksgiving Appetizer Recipes

Thanksgiving Dessert Recipes

We Can Work It Out!

Lauren Purcell's ApartmentI was that kid who in kindergarten was an avid earner of gold stars. In grade school, I cared a lot about my report card. Which may explain my dismay that years later I’m scraping by with a C-minus in kitchen renovation. I have yet to create the binder of inspiration pages torn from magazines that I imagine every “good” renovator has. It took me three weeks to sign off on the refrigerator my designer recommended because I insisted on seeing it in person. I’m the worst kind of perfectionist—one who’s also a procrastinator.

 

Or maybe I procrastinate because I’m a perfectionist. That’s the diagnosis I got when I confessed all to my “kitchen therapist,” ApartmentTherapy.com’s Maxwell Ryan. “You want the renovation to be perfect, but you’re also afraid it’s going to fail,” he said.

 

Maxwell has a hilarious (but scarily right-on) trick for grouping renovators into four types: Each is one of the Beatles. “You’re George Harrison, the idealist, the guy who took the band to India,” he teased me. “You’re making a simple kitchen renovation into a whole journey.” Luckily, he also told me what I could do about it—and I asked him for advice for the other Beatles, too, so you can identify yourself and make good progress on your own project.

–Lauren Purcell, Editor-in-Chief

 

What Type Of Renovator Are You?

Tell us below in the comments.

 

Beatles_John Lennon

YOU’RE A TOE-TAPPER IF…

you’re take-charge and decisive but can be impatient. You’re fiery, with a bit of a temper.

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE: John Lennon. “He ran off with Yoko,” Maxwell says. “He pushed boundaries to get results.”

SO NOW WHAT? To avoid making snap decisions you might regret later, “readjust your time line to account for the fact that some details require a little reflection,” Maxwell says.

 

Beatles_Paul McCartney
YOU’RE AN ENTHUSIAST IF…

you’re easy to please, sometimes too easy. Does “Oh, but I like all of them!” sound familiar?

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE:Paul McCartney. “He’s charming, always happy and never cared how much time it took to finish an album because he enjoyed the process,” Maxwell says.

SO NOW WHAT?Let your designer know that less is more—fewer options means you’ll make decisions more quickly.

Beatles_George Harrison
YOU’RE A PERFECTIONIST IF…

you want—need!—things to be exactly right. So you agonize over even the smallest detail.

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE:George Harrison. “He was the introspective one, the idealist,” Maxwell says.

SO NOW WHAT?Hire a designer who’s also a perfectionist. That way you can trust that she’s picking the four best backsplash tiles from the hundreds of options. And you can stop obsessing.

Beatles_Ringo Starr
YOU’RE A ZEN MASTER IF…

you believe in the slow and steady approach. You take direction well and appreciate support.

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE:Ringo Starr. “He’s calm and cool,” Maxwell says. “He’s probably got the lowest blood pressure, too!”

SO NOW WHAT? You may need a slight kick to get things moving, so set goals and deadlines with your designer—and then ask him to really push you to meet them.

 

Follow along with Lauren as she shares her progress and everything else, from the appliances to keeping costs down to injecting personality into one of the most important rooms in her home.

 

More Kitchen Renovation Posts:

The “Before” Photos

The Reluctant Renovator: Getting Started

The First Step for Your Kitchen Renovation

 

What I Ate Last Night: Cole’s Greenwich Village

Last night I had dinner at Cole’s Greenwich Village. While I was waiting for my dinner guest, who was dragging himself through the swamp that is New York City in nearly 100-degree weather, I sat at the bar and tried the Cole’s Cocktail (I assumed if they’d named it after themselves, they’re pretty proud of it). Menu description: Crop organic vodka, ver jus, St. Germain, rosemary. It went down very easily, since I’d just come in from that same swamp myself.
LEP_Coles GV Drink

 

A small starter sent out from the kitchen: Heirloom Tomato and Watermelon Salad. It was made that night with burrata. Delicious. Which is why I forgot to take the photo first and all you get to see is the last bite.

LEP_Coles GV Salad

 

Next came stuffed squash blossoms and Quick Seared Squid—both great. Forgive the picture quality. It’s dark in there! (And I never use the flash in a restaurant.)

LEP_Coles GV Squid

 

Main course: cod with bok choy and maitake mushrooms in a red pepper broth. My guest had pork tenderloin with a bourbon glaze with corn succotash and black-eyed peas. We ended with a dessert brought over by Chef Daniel Eardley, who sat and talked for a while. Great guy, fun restaurant. If you’re in the New York City, go check it out. –Lauren Purcell, Editor-in-Chief

LEP_Coles GV Cod


Watermelon Cocktail Time

I love our Get Fresh column because, even though I freely confess to a dependency on Lay’s potato chips, I’m also a fresh fruit and vegetable enthusiast, especially in the summer. So I encourage you to check out (and tear out) “Get Fresh with Watermelon” in our July/August issue, which is full of fun facts and helpful tips.

 

What we didn’t have room to include is the recipe for my favorite watermelon cocktail. My sister, Anne, and I concocted it for our Sisters’ Secrets to Confident Entertaining newsletter long before I became editor of Every Day with Rachael Ray, but you guys are my priority now, so I’m sharing!

—Lauren Purcell, Editor-in-Chief

Watermelon Quencher
Makes 2 drinks
2 ounces fresh watermelon juice*
1 ounce vodka
½ ounce triple sec
½ ounce fresh lemon juice

 

Combine all the ingredients in a shaker with ice and shake 10 to 15 times to chill. Pour, with ice, into a glass rimmed with a mixture of half sugar, half salt.

 

Extra credit: Tint the sugar-salt mix with a couple of drops of red food coloring.

 

*To help you with portions: We bought a watermelon wedge that weighed about 2 1/2 pounds. That yielded about 4 cups of chunks. Puree those in the food processor (if you’re not using a seedless melon, please remove the seeds first), strain the mixture through a sieve, and you get about 1 1/2 cups of juice—enough for six cocktails. For kids and designated drivers, the watermelon juice, with or without a squeeze of lemon, is great straight up or mixed with seltzer.

 

More related content:
Get Fresh…with Strawberries!

Summer Cocktail Recipes

Easy Cocktail Upgrades

 

I Heart Watermelon Cocktails

Pink cocktails are my guilty pleasure. They simultaneously appeal to my inner girly-girl and taste a-maz-ing, and yet, I rarely order them in public. After bartending many years ago on the opening night of the first Sex and the City movie and making over 200 Cosmopolitans, I don’t think I (or any other bartender for that matter) can look at a pink drink in the same way. That being said, I do make an exception for watermelon cocktails. Juicy sweet and irresistibly fresh, watermelon–in juice or puree form– is like putting summer into a glass. So when there’s a watermelon cocktail on a menu, you better believe I’m gonna order it, but since that can get expensive, here’s a few of my favorite watermelon drinks that you can make at home.

 

Watermelon

Photo by Plamen Petkov

 

Get the recipes:

 

 

Watermelon Quencher

Watermelon Quencher

This lovely libation from our Editor-in-Chief, Lauren Purcell, and her sister, Anne, will put smiles on everyone’s faces. Use a couple drops of red food coloring to tint the sugar-salt mixture for a colorful cocktail rim.

Watermelon-Plum Sangria

Watermelon-Plum Sangria

Two kinds of plums and a half of a watermelon is all you’ll need for this thirst-quenching sip. Use a melon baller to scoop balls out of the watermelon, then plop ‘em into your pitcher. How easy is that?!

Melon Patch Champagne Cocktail

Melon Patch Champagne Cocktail

From our “Year of Champagne Cocktails” recipe collection, this June-inspired sparkler combines slightly sweet watermelon, botanical-infused gin and savory rosemary to create a crisp, clean and ultra-refreshing concoction.

Watermelon Mint Cooler

Watermelon Mint Cooler

Mint and lime heighten the cooling and refreshing factors in this 4-ingredient cocktail. Make it by the pitcher for the easiest signature party cocktail ever!

 

More Cocktails:

Iced Tea Recipes

5 Easy Party Pitcher Cocktails

Battle of the Citrus Cocktails: Lemon versus Lime

 

Moveable Feasts: The Vendy Awards

The Vendy Awards are quickly becoming the nation’s most anticipated food awards. The food-truck cooking competitions, hosted by New York City’s Street Vendor Project since 2005, are sold-out street-fare feasts, where cupcake carts, dumpling huts, ramen trucks and kebab stands hand out samples to hungry crowds. Last year, the Vendys took their show on the road, staging local ceremonies across the nation from Los Angeles to Philly and will be adding more cities this year.

Vendy Awards New York 2012

As our Editor-in-Chief, Lauren Purcell, gears up to judge this weekend’s 2013 Philadelphia Vendy Awards, we decided to take a look back at last year’s New York City Vendy Awards, where we spent a sunny afternoon filled with mouthwatering mobile meals made on the spot. We feasted on everything from adobo chicken spring rolls to red velvet ice cream sandwiches, and joined attendees in voting on which vendors should be victorious–which was no easy task. At the end of the day though, we walked away with a recipe from each of the five winning vendors–so you can experience the deliciousness at home.

Rookie of the Year Award: Phil’s Steaks

Vendys Trucks: Phil's Steaks

There are the usual Philly-style cheesesteaks, and then there’s Phil’s Steaks’ “whiz wit’ ” (aka with Cheez Whiz and sautéed onions). Head chef Kevin McConnell hungered to start a culinary business, so he and three friends made a pact at a rooftop party to launch second careers. “If you don’t do something that makes you nervous and take a little risk, you’re not going to really succeed.” Proof is in the pudding: Phil’s earned the Vendys’ coveted Rookie of the Year award.

Get the recipe: Cheesesteak “Whiz Wit”

 

People’s Choice Award: The Cinnamon Snail

Vendys Trucks: The Cinnamon Snail

Chef Adam Sobel is on a mission to change public opinion about vegan food. Since 2010, he’s owned NYC’s The Cinnamon Snail, the country’s first organic vegan food truck, where he serves the likes of jalapeño-cacao brownies, chile-spiked seitan burgers and fresh fig pancakes. “I wanted to bring really flavorful gourmet vegetarian food to people who wouldn’t normally walk into a vegetarian restaurant,” he says. Impressed? So was the crowd, who honored his truck with the People’s Choice award.

Get the recipe: Vegan Fig Pancakes with Pine Nut Butter

 

Best Market Vendor Award: Lumpia Shack

Vendys Trucks: Lumpia Shack

Chef Neil Syham’s Brooklyn, NY, weekend stand selling lumpia, or Filipino spring rolls, was “born from a love of Filipino food.” A Manila native and former corporate chef, he sought to update his homeland’s cuisine using seasonal, farm-fresh ingredients. The Best Market Vendor winner adds modern twists, like seafood and vegetable combos, to his perfectly fried wrappers. Syham has become so successful, he’s rolled out a second Brooklyn food stand.

Get the recipe: Chicken Adobo Lumpias


Best Dessert Award: Melt Bakery

Vendys Trucks: Melt Bakery

Julian Plyter and Kareem Hamady may have had one of the littlest venues at the Vendy’s—a refrigerated pushcart—but they won a big Vendy award: Best Dessert. In 2010, the duo started drawing crowds at a NYC flea market with their scrumptious ice cream sandwiches. Hamady, who cooks up business tactics, convinced Plyter, a former Manhattan pastry chef, to focus on a mobile operation rather than a full-fledged bakery. Now they’ve come full circle, earning enough from carts to open up a shop in Manhattan!

Get the recipe: Red Velvet Meltcakes


Vendy Cup Award: Piaztlan Mexican

Vendys Trucks: Piaztlan Mexican

For Eleazar Perez, taking home the Vendy Cup, the event’s top prize, for her succulent steak, goat and roast pork tacos—served with a trio of house-made salsas—was a recognition she never dreamed of, despite her 23-year food-vendor career. The Piaxtla, Mexico, native began by selling tamales from a van in Brooklyn. Now, she and her three children have their own truck and a permit in the Red Hook Ballfields, a favorite foodie destination, where the lines wrap around the block for her fabulous food.

Get the recipe: Red Tomato Salsa
Eleazar Perez’s secret-weapon salsas are a blend of cooked tomatoes–and lots of chiles!

 

Join the mailing list at streetvendor.org for more information and to nominate your favorite vendors and to stay up to date on future Vendy Cities.

Text by Rachel Wharton;  Photography by Melanie Dunea