kitchen

Win Everything You Need for an Organized Kitchen from OXO

Today’s Love Your Kitchen Challenge is to clear the clutter! That means donate or toss out two kitchen tools you haven’t used in the past six months. Trust us: If you’re not sure what it does, you don’t need it! But that’s not all. Once you’ve de-cluttered your kitchen, enter to win $250 worth of products from OXO — which basically covers anything and everything you could possibly need to organize your kitchen. All you have to do is tag your pic on Instagram using the #OXOsweepstakes hashtag and you’ll be entered to win all of the products below. Totally worth cleaning, right?

Expandable Utensil Holder

Read more

Over My Dead Body…

…Is what my mom said when Patty Smyth—the singer/songwriter aptly known for “Goodbye to You”—attempted to repo our stove.

 

You see, the coastal Brooklyn house my mom bought in 1976 had long been a second home to Patty, whose stepmother, Cookie, had grown up there. The stove that came with the place was indeed a beauty: the same vintage Chambers model Rach used to have on her set, except ours was powder blue, not yellow.

 

Every once in a while Patty would swing by the house to see how the stove was doing. Well, to say hi to the family, too, but mostly to make sure her cherished heirloom was still around.

 

Once, when I was in college, my mom called me and said, “John is here and wants the stove.”

Me: “John who?”

Mom: “Johnny Mac.”

Me: “MacEnroe?”

Mom: “Yeah—and I told him over my dead body.”

 

Yes, she summarily shot down the era’s most famous tennis player—who also happened to be Patty’s husband.

 

My mother loved that stove. Never mind that we had to light the burners with a match. Or that the oven wasn’t spacious enough to hold a decent turkey (sort of crucial when you host Thanksgiving every year). Or that the merest breeze would kill the pilot light along with the burners, and we’d have to wait at least 30 minutes before turning the gas back on—or risk getting blown off our feet by a gas surge (believe me, I know from personal experience).

 

Our beloved stove

 

Despite all the stove’s shortcomings, her love for it was unflinching, no matter how much her culinary-minded children pleaded for an upgrade.  After all, this stove had been her trusty sidekick throughout her adult life. Those burners heated the first meal she made as a homeowner—and the water for my first bottle.  That oven helped us celebrate every conceivable family milestone—and achievement, big or small.

 

But after this 36-year love affair, everything changed in an instant: The night Sandy hit, five feet of water swallowed the stove whole.

 

You know the rest of this story by now—about the devastation and loss that reached far and wide. And while the household essentials were comparatively minor casualties, my mother couldn’t bear to part with the stove. She often said it had a soul; the prospect of discarding such a beloved being broke her heart.

 

Our kitchen post Sandy

 

Now, even after her herculean mold-, rust-, grime- and debris-removal efforts, the poor thing is still “resting” outside while we search for ever more advanced resurrection methods.

 

In its place sits a shiny new oven big enough to hold a 40-pound turkey—much to her children’s delight. But somehow, mom hasn’t quite gotten used to the idea that knobs alone can fire up burners.  No matches required.

 

Our new kitchen

Patty did stop by the house after Sandy to make sure we were okay. And of course, to check on the Chambers. She was saddened by its streaks and corroded innards, but relieved it was still there.

I’ve urged my mother to pay it…backward and relinquish the stove to Patty. And you know what? Mom’s almost there. But I have a feeling that “almost” could last for a while.

 

Written by Chris Jette, Meredith senior marketing manager

 

Related Links

Eight Long Months After Hurricane Sandy

The First Steps for Your Kitchen Renovation

Reluctant Renovator

 

Rocca Stars in the Kitchen

Guess who’s here to dish on cooking with the nation’s most beloved nannas (and poppas)! Daily Show vet Mo Rocca, whose Cooking Channel series, My Grandmother’s Ravioli, kicks off its second season this month.

By David Farley

 

Q: How did the show get its name?

A: My granmother made pasta from scratch, and her ravioli were big pockets stuffed with ground beef, spinach and garlic with a light tomato sauce. They were delicious – and large and light and delicate. So when Nora Ephron was a guest on my NPR show, Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me!—and I was talking about the inspiration for my new cooking show—she pointed out that My Grandmother’s Ravioli was the obvious name. I loved going back to the network people to say not only did I have a great name, but Nora Ephron helped me come up with it.

Q: How do you decide who will be featured?

A: We want people who really care about cooking. They also have to have a good personality, but not in that crazy reality TV way. These are people you actually want to be related to.

Q: The show has you cooking with grandmas from everywhere. Have you found a universal ingredient?

A: Garlic. Everyone uses it. In fact, my own Italian grandmother’s apartment always smelled like garlic.

Q: What’s been the biggest surprise?

A: Almost none of the grandmothers measure ingredients. And grandfathers measure even less! They’re extreme non-measurers!

Q: Beyond recipes, what have you learned?

A: How to cut onions without crying. From a Pakistani grandfather, actually, I learned that you should drink a glass of red wine before cutting them. Though he may just have wanted an excuse to drink wine.

 

 

Explore more of our celebrity interviews here.

We Can Work It Out!

Lauren Purcell's ApartmentI was that kid who in kindergarten was an avid earner of gold stars. In grade school, I cared a lot about my report card. Which may explain my dismay that years later I’m scraping by with a C-minus in kitchen renovation. I have yet to create the binder of inspiration pages torn from magazines that I imagine every “good” renovator has. It took me three weeks to sign off on the refrigerator my designer recommended because I insisted on seeing it in person. I’m the worst kind of perfectionist—one who’s also a procrastinator.

 

Or maybe I procrastinate because I’m a perfectionist. That’s the diagnosis I got when I confessed all to my “kitchen therapist,” ApartmentTherapy.com’s Maxwell Ryan. “You want the renovation to be perfect, but you’re also afraid it’s going to fail,” he said.

 

Maxwell has a hilarious (but scarily right-on) trick for grouping renovators into four types: Each is one of the Beatles. “You’re George Harrison, the idealist, the guy who took the band to India,” he teased me. “You’re making a simple kitchen renovation into a whole journey.” Luckily, he also told me what I could do about it—and I asked him for advice for the other Beatles, too, so you can identify yourself and make good progress on your own project.

–Lauren Purcell, Editor-in-Chief

 

What Type Of Renovator Are You?

Tell us below in the comments.

 

Beatles_John Lennon

YOU’RE A TOE-TAPPER IF…

you’re take-charge and decisive but can be impatient. You’re fiery, with a bit of a temper.

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE: John Lennon. “He ran off with Yoko,” Maxwell says. “He pushed boundaries to get results.”

SO NOW WHAT? To avoid making snap decisions you might regret later, “readjust your time line to account for the fact that some details require a little reflection,” Maxwell says.

 

Beatles_Paul McCartney
YOU’RE AN ENTHUSIAST IF…

you’re easy to please, sometimes too easy. Does “Oh, but I like all of them!” sound familiar?

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE:Paul McCartney. “He’s charming, always happy and never cared how much time it took to finish an album because he enjoyed the process,” Maxwell says.

SO NOW WHAT?Let your designer know that less is more—fewer options means you’ll make decisions more quickly.

Beatles_George Harrison
YOU’RE A PERFECTIONIST IF…

you want—need!—things to be exactly right. So you agonize over even the smallest detail.

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE:George Harrison. “He was the introspective one, the idealist,” Maxwell says.

SO NOW WHAT?Hire a designer who’s also a perfectionist. That way you can trust that she’s picking the four best backsplash tiles from the hundreds of options. And you can stop obsessing.

Beatles_Ringo Starr
YOU’RE A ZEN MASTER IF…

you believe in the slow and steady approach. You take direction well and appreciate support.

YOUR SPIRIT-BEATLE:Ringo Starr. “He’s calm and cool,” Maxwell says. “He’s probably got the lowest blood pressure, too!”

SO NOW WHAT? You may need a slight kick to get things moving, so set goals and deadlines with your designer—and then ask him to really push you to meet them.

 

Follow along with Lauren as she shares her progress and everything else, from the appliances to keeping costs down to injecting personality into one of the most important rooms in her home.

 

More Kitchen Renovation Posts:

The “Before” Photos

The Reluctant Renovator: Getting Started

The First Step for Your Kitchen Renovation

 

How to Roast Peppers

Roasting peppers teases out their sweetness and gives them a smoky edge (And they make Rachael’s Birds in a Nest with Peppers & Sausage oh so good.) Jarred roasted peppers are a good shortcut, but you’ll get a fresher flavor and firmer texture by making your own. It couldn’t be easier: Follow our to-do tutorial below, heat up the broiler and get cooking!

Birds in a Nest with Peppers & Sausage

Get Rach’s Birds in a Nest with Peppers & Sausage recipe!

 

 

1. Place the peppers on a rimmed baking sheet or broiler pan and broil, turning often with tongs, until blistered all over, about 8 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

2. While warm, stick the peppers in a glass or metal bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Let stand until cool enough to handle.

3. Remove the peppers from the bowl and peel off the skin. Cut out the stem and ribs, toss the seeds and you’re done!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustrations by Emma Kelly

That’s it! Now, get roastin’ and share your success stories with us below in our comments!

The First Step For Your Kitchen Renovation

Design guru, Maxwell Ryan of ApartmentTherapy.com, gave our editor-in-chief, Lauren Purcell, one goal before they started collaborating on her kitchen: to get inspired.

If you’re working on your own renovation, that means to dream a little bit! Collect images of rooms that you love. The goal is to give yourself a guiding star that will pull and excite you (because the rest of the process can get you stuck in the weeds and you’re going to have to change you mind a lot). “Starting out with a firm idea of inspiration will act as your lighthouse to carry you across the sea that you’re going to embark on throughout the course of your renovation,” Ryan says.

Lauren started her own kitchen inspiration Pinterest board to keep track of her ideas (and Maxwell contributed to the board, too!). Check it out!

Lauren's Pinterest Board

Reluctant Renovator: The “Before” Photos

We told you all about our editor-in-chief, Lauren Purcell’s, kitchen renovation. Now, take a peek at the “before” photos of her 61-square-foot kitchen (it’s in Manhattan, people!). She shared Instagram pics of the space and filled us in on some of her most troublesome elements.

Kitchen before

 ”The best part about my kitchen now is that it faces a big window in my living room.”

Recycling and garbage bins

 ”I’d like to hide the recycling and garbage bins, but I don’t want to have to open trash drawers with dirty hands. Do they make doors you open with your feet?”

faucet

“The faucet has sprung a tiny leak. (Hey, you can’t have sufficiently awful “Before” photos without some duct tape.)”

kitchen before 2

“Nice gaps between the counter and appliances, eh? I dread discovering what’s fallen down there!”

microwave

“OK, I have no shame: I’m revealing to the world that I’m using a scrunchie to remind me not to pull the bottom of the microwave handle, which has detached. (The scrunchie is meant to go on a wine bottle, not a ponytail. Does that redeem me at all?)”

oven

“A nonfunctioning oven means two things: lots of sautéing and more storage!”

The Reluctant Renovator

I know a fair amount about kitchens. I edit this magazine. I’ve written a cookbook. I eat. Yet when it comes to renovating a kitchen, I have to admit, I feel completely out of my league. Just for starters: What’s the difference between an architect and a kitchen designer–and which do I need? I find the whole process so intimidating that I put off renovating until the oven finally stopped working altogether. Now that’s urgent. I hear from lots of you who, like me, are beyond busy and have limited budgets. So over the next few months, I’ll share my own experiences as a first-time renovator–missteps, anxiety and all. Follow along as I overhaul my palatial 61-square-foot kitchen. (It’s in Manhattan, people!) I’ll be soliciting your advice, ideas…and sympathy!
–Lauren Purcell, Editor-in-Chief 


But she won’t be doing it alone! Design guru Maxwell Ryan, founder of design website apartmenttherapy.com, will be guiding Lauren through her kitchen renovation.

At first meeting, he laid out his plan for a stress-free makeover. It’s just a matter of dividing the process into steps, so you don’t get overwhelmed,” he said. Here are his first three:

1. Gather ideas from the pros. Walk through your kitchen with at least three contractors, architects or designers. Ask them all the same questions, but also see what they suggest. some will just do what you specify, while others may figure out surprising ways to work with your space.

2. Focus on the floor plan. At first, don’t think about color or details. Just focus on the black-and-white map of where things are placed. Throwing in cosmetic decisions now will only bog you down.

3. Think about your style. Sift through your tear-sheet file or Pinterest board to get a clear vision of what you like. This is when you start to crunch the numbers. You can always swap out appliances, materials and finishes to bring your cost down.

Follow along with Lauren as she shares her progress and everything else, from the appliances to keeping costs down to injecting personality into one of the most important rooms in her home.