food

How to Roast Peppers

Roasting peppers teases out their sweetness and gives them a smoky edge (And they make Rachael’s Birds in a Nest with Peppers & Sausage oh so good.) Jarred roasted peppers are a good shortcut, but you’ll get a fresher flavor and firmer texture by making your own. It couldn’t be easier: Follow our to-do tutorial below, heat up the broiler and get cooking!

Birds in a Nest with Peppers & Sausage

Get Rach’s Birds in a Nest with Peppers & Sausage recipe!

 

 

1. Place the peppers on a rimmed baking sheet or broiler pan and broil, turning often with tongs, until blistered all over, about 8 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

2. While warm, stick the peppers in a glass or metal bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Let stand until cool enough to handle.

3. Remove the peppers from the bowl and peel off the skin. Cut out the stem and ribs, toss the seeds and you’re done!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustrations by Emma Kelly

That’s it! Now, get roastin’ and share your success stories with us below in our comments!

Meatless Monday: Mushroom Madness

Exotic MushroomsMushrooms can be a bit of an intimidating ingredient. I remember as a kid, my scientist mother told me that that they’re actually an “edible fungi” and that yes, I am supposed to eat them despite my knee-jerk reaction. “But don’t eat all of them,” she warned, “because certain varieties, like the ones in the park, could be poisonous.” Wait, what? Poisonous?! Talk about being confused from a young age!

 

Don’t recognize the exotic varieties (pictured, left)? Click here to get the scoop on each one plus how to cook with it.

 

These days though, I am a true believer in the magic of mushrooms–no, not that kind of magic–I’m talking about their ability to provide tons of flavor and enhance the other foods that they’re paired with. Don’t believe me? Well, it’s science! Mushrooms are high in glutamate, (an amino acid), making them the king of “umami,” that fifth hard-to-describe savory taste also found in aged cheeses, soy sauce and cured meats.

 

So what does this have to do with Meatless Monday? When you’re looking for a vegetarian recipe that will satisfy every palate, reach for mushrooms! With their distinctive texture and flavor boosting powers, you won’t even notice that the meal is missing meat! (Plus, by going for mushrooms, you can even save a couple bucks compared to buying meat and calories!) Check out some of our favorite meatless mushrooms recipes below!

 

Tuscan Risotto with Walnuts & Mushrooms recipe

Tuscan Risotto with Walnuts & Mushrooms

This 30-Minute Meal from Rachael Ray features porcini mushrooms and is great when you’re looking for a comforting bowl of rich and luxurious risotto. Plus, it’s as easy as making a bowl of steamed rice!

Mushroom, Ancho & Black Bean Chili recipe

Mushroom, Ancho & Black Bean Chili

This hearty 30-Minute Meal features cremini or your choice of mixed mushrooms and is delicious topped with shredded cheese, pickled jalapeno chile peppers and crushed tortilla chips! Make a large batch on the weekend and you’ll have lunch all weeklong!

Mushroom and Garlic Pizza

Mushrooms and Garlic Pizza

This simple pizza features shiitake and white mushrooms. Make prep time even faster on busy weeknights by substituting a store-bought crust. Then, once you’ve memorized the easy recipe, experiment by using different combinations of mushrooms and cheese and adding on some of your other favorite ingredients! My personal favorite? Cracking an egg on top and letting it bake slowly!

Mushroom & Egg Toasts

Mushrooms & Egg Toasts

Mushrooms are great any time of the day! Try them for B, L or D–breakfast, lunch or dinner–with these tasty toasts. Once you master this basic sauté, get creative and add in your own mix-ins like cheese or avocado.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s YOUR favorite mushrooms? Tell us below in the comments!

 

 

 

 

 

RELATED:

Meatless Monday: Vegetarian Curry Recipes 

Meatless Monday: Eggplant

Meatless Monday: Tofu Ramen Soup

 


Meatless Monday: Tofu Ramen Soup

Turn Monday night into a meatless and budget-friendly dinner with this Tofu Ramen Soup with Spinach. Most Asian noodles are supermarket bargains. But none so much than ramen. This isn’t just an American dorm-room staple: Japanese home cooks rely on the thin, squiggly noodles to give heft to soups, like this simple tofu-and-spinach version.

Takashi Yagihashi, of Slurping Turtle and Takashi in Chicago says “I loved instant ramen noodles as a kid, and I still love them! Buy bricks in the plastic-wrapped packages for about a quarter each; ditch the powdered stuff and serve with your own homemade soup.”

Tofu Ramen Soup with Spinach

More! Why should spaghetti get all the love? Get more fast, flavorful and easy on your wallet Asian noodle recipes here.