The Pastry School Diaries: Patience is a Virtue

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Pastry & Baking Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences! 

To this day, I am continually asked the question, “why pastry—why not culinary?” My go-to response is something along the lines of, “I’ve always wanted to delve deeper into the world of pastry arts. Since there is such a science behind it, I know I would benefit and learn more at pastry school than at culinary school. Besides, I don’t have the patience to learn how to chiffonade basil, dice an onion or poach an egg—I do that all the time at home already!”


Want to know what else I don’t have the patience for? Building, frosting and decorating a perfect cake.


We’ve transitioned from baking rustic desserts like crumb cake and muffins to more detail-oriented techniques: using a serrated knife to create a perfectly flat and round cake; Frosting in even layers that conceal any cake or crumbs; Piping perfect shells and rosettes around the edges to make a bakery-quality confection. As I’m getting my first taste (figuratively and literally!) of what our final project will be (creating a three-tiered celebration cake), I’m truly beginning to understand that patience is a virtue. Every step must be taken in a slow, methodical manner—you absolutely cannot rush the process. If you slice off too much of your cake, there’s not much you can do to remedy it, and while frosting can be spread and piped over again, there’s no hope in getting those little stray crumbs out (a cake baker’s worst nightmare).


So as I’m learning from my mistakes and trying new things, I’m thankful for this opportunity of trial and error. Am I set out to be the next Duff Goldman? Probably not. But I’m looking forward to seeing my skills in the cake department improve.


Check back next week for more pastry school fun!

The Pastry School Diaries: It’s Not Always a Cake Walk

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Pastry & Baking Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences! 

As our second unit came to an end, I was happy to be leaving breads and doughs behind for something a little lighter: cakes!



I’m familiar with a wide variety of cakes: red velvet, carrot, angel food, flourless chocolate, pineapple upside down–you get the idea. But I had no idea how many different methods there were to making cakes, and that each method has a never-ending list of ways to tweak, flavor and recreate it into a brand new dessert.



Of course we’re beginning with the simplest methods and recipes, like the creaming method, where you beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy then alternate adding your wet and dry ingredients. We’ve made carrot cake, chocolate cake, crumb cake, muffins and more pound cake than I can even comprehend. But out of all the subjects we’ve covered so far, I’m most excited about what I’ve learned so far about cakes–and can’t wait to learn more!


Something I’ll definitely have to get used to, though, is how to tell when a cake is ready to come out of the oven. With breads and pastry dough, more color means more flavor. You can decide when your bread is done based on how dark you want the crust to be. That is not the case with cakes, as some treats shouldn’t be darker than a light bronze.  A few extra minutes in the oven may not seem like a big deal for a loaf of bread, but those same few minutes could dry out and potentially ruin a cake or muffin. It’s a race against the clock, but I’ve enjoyed the attention to detail, not to mention the final product very much!


Class is breaking for the holidays (yay!), so check back in 2016 for more sweet updates.


A Cake That Calls Your Name

Why bake from a box when you can make this? Our creamy-dreamy chocolate cake with almond-coconut filing is a cinch and will serve up sweet savings as it costs only $1.60 per slice versus $7 restaurant slices.

Almond Joy Cake

Get the recipe: Almond Joy Layer Cake 



Cake Decorating Tips and Ideas

FREE Mix-and-Match Cakes Guide [Downloadable PDF]

26 Decadent Chocolate Dessert Recipes