Lauren Katz

How to Throw a Sandwich Party

Here’s your next great party idea: a DIY sandwich party! Buy your sub rolls, all the fixins and let your guests get to work. It’ll be the best thing since sliced bread!

 

Here’s what you need to know:

 

Weigh to go

Plan at least three-quarters of a pound of meat and cheese combined per foot-long sandwich

 

Get bready

Buy one 12-inch loaf for each sandwich-maker. Split the loaves lengthwise and trim off the narrow ends. Once the sandwiches are stuffed, line them up end-to-end (and take a photo of your monster sammie!). To serve, slice into 2-inch portions

 

Nice spread

Set out condiments like mustard, mayo, dressing and barbecue sauce, or make the delicious creations below.

 

Caper Spread

Bacon Mayo

Top it off

Set up a selection of all sorts of cool, crunchy, tangy and sweet toppings, like sliced tomatoes, onions, pickles, peppers, fresh herbs, radishes, even apples!

 

Here are some recipe ideas to get you started:

Sliced Steak Club Subs

Italian Hoagies

Cheesy Sausage Subs

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The Pastry School Diaries: Crust is a Must

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Pastry & Baking Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences! 

 

This was an especially production-heavy week, as we made five different doughs and about 20 filled tarts, pies and shells. What I’m learning–and loving–about the more rustic desserts is that they’re supposed to be imperfect. The filling itself is more of a trial and error process than a science. For example, we made a delicious plum galette, despite the fact that plums aren’t in season. To remedy this problem, we sliced the plums very thin and roasted them with lots of delicious flavor additions, like ginger and lemon zest.

 

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5 Ways to Dress Up Your Sandwich

There are so many ways to enjoy a sandwich, and so many reasons to love them: you can put just about anything you want on them, they work for breakfast, lunch, dinner and even dessert, you can fit all–or most–of the food groups into one portable meal and the combinations are literally never-ending.  But for those times when you just can’t bare to look at another leaf of romaine or slice of cheese, we’ve rounded up five delicious sandwich additions that you’re sure to love.

 

Raw-Beet Slaw

 
 

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Kick Off November with 5 Comforting Weeknight Meals

Get your oversized sweaters and stretchy pants out of storage–it’s officially comfort food season! From now until spring, we’ll be cooking up hearty stews, roasting veggies and baking until even our mixers are tired, and we want you to do the same! But comfort food doesn’t mean you need to slave away in the kitchen all day. These five dinners are quick enough for a weeknight but cozy enough for a relaxing evening by the fire. Get ready to bundle up!

 

Monday, November 2

Chickpea Soup

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The Pastry School Diaries: Around the World in One Class

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Pastry & Baking Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences! 

 

My taste buds traveled to the American South and across the pond all in the same day, as we learned how to make biscuits and scones. I had no idea I would enjoy making these doughs as much as I did, but after learning how simple, versatile and surprisingly stress-relieving the technique is, I already have plans to try it at home.

 

Want to know the differences between scone dough and biscuit dough? For both doughs, you combine your dry ingredients in a bowl, add your cold butter and work it down with your hands into small pieces. This can take quite a while, but the motion and texture of it feels like you’re in an edible zen garden. Very relaxing after a long day! Next, add your liquid and work the dough until it is just combined.

When making scones, you use the mealy dough method, while biscuits use the flaky dough method. The mealy method means that while breaking down the butter into the dry ingredients, you need to keep working it until there is no butter apparent. In the flaky method, you only have to work the butter down until it is the size of a hazelnut.


Scones typically contain sugar and other sweet ingredients like dried fruit or chocolate, while biscuits are typically savory.

Biscuits with sharp cheddar cheese and chives

The traditional biscuit shape is round while scones are made triangular by forming large discs and slicing wedges before baking.

 

Scones are known to be served with clotted cream, jam and tea, while biscuits can be served with butter, honey and ham.

Scones with cornmeal, lemon zest and dried cherries

Both are equally delicious and easy to make. It just depends on what part of the world you want to be in!

Stay tuned for more sweet dough lessons next week!

The Pastry School Diaries: It’s the Season for Layers

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Pastry & Baking Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences! 

 

Remember last week when I told you we prepped the dough for croissants and danishes? Well, the day finally arrived when we got to roll out, form, fill, bake–and devour–the finished product. These two pastries are definitely a labor of love. They are made from a laminate dough, which is dough that has been covered with a layer of butter, folded over itself, rolled out and repeated twice more. This process forms paper-thin alternating layers of dough and butter, resulting in that sinfully delicious, flaky texture that we have known to associate with French pastries. What makes a danish different from a croissant is two key ingredients: eggs, which create a more cake-like texture, and cardamom, a popular spice in Scandinavian baking.

 

Almond croissants

 

What I liked about making croissants and danishes is the variety and liberty we had in both shape and filling. We made four types of croissant: plain, almond, chocolate and ham and cheese. For the danishes, fillings included pastry cream, frangipane (an almond filling), various fruits, a ricotta-raisin mixture and pureed prunes. We had a variety of shapes to experiment with as well.

 

Ham & cheese croissant

Braided Danish filled with ricotta, raisins and poached pineapple

 

A variety of bear claw, pinwheel and envelope Danishes

 

I’m not sure I would try my hand at making these at home quite yet, but I’m glad I learned the process. If you do, however, have the desire, time and, most importantly, counter space to try making laminate dough at home, here are my “things they only tell you in pastry school” tips:

1. When making, folding and rolling out your dough, keep everything as cold as possible. The butter cannot melt, or else you won’t get those beautiful air pockets that we all know and love about croissants.

2. Use a ruler to measure out the dough. Each pastry should be roughly the same exact size, which allows for uniform baking time (and no fighting over the biggest one!).

3. When working with liquid fillings, don’t overdo it. The filling is just going to spill out during baking.

4. When working with solid fillings, like ham and cheese, you can go a little heavier. Because no one wants a ham-less ham and cheese croissant.

5. Be sure to egg wash the ends of your dough. Seal it tightly so your filling doesn’t fall out and your pastry maintains its shape.

6. Got leftovers? Wrap them in a layer of plastic wrap, followed by a layer of tinfoil and stick them in the freezer. They will thaw looking as perfect as they did when they were hot out of the oven!

Check back next week for more baking tips!

7 Ways to Use All of the Pumpkin

The Pumpkin Spice Latte might arrive to the fall party a little too early, but you know it’s officially pumpkin season when shelves are lined with cans of it, pastry counters are filled with squash-stuffed desserts and your Instagram feed has more orange than you ever thought was possible. This year, rather than sticking to your typical pie or cake, try something new! We’ve collected seven of our favorite ways to incorporate this gorgeous gourd into all things sweet and savory. Who needs a latte, after all?

 

Pumpkin Quesadillas

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10th Anniversary Recap: How New York City Helped Celebrate 10 Years of Rachael Ray Every Day

It was a food- and fun-filled day on October 14th, as lots of New Yorkers came out to celebrate 10 years of our magazine. A Rachael Ray Every Day food truck arrived bright and early to midtown, NYC to pass out breakfast sandwiches and hash browns to hungry commuters.

 

Meanwhile, Rachael appeared on Morning Joe, sharing recipes from her new cookbook, Everyone Is Italian on Sunday, and recounting lots of delicious memories from the last decade. The hot topic of the conversation: how gathering around the table with family and friends enriches your life of so many levels!

 

 

Switching channels to PIX11, our Executive Food Editor, Nina Elder, shared some fun fall squash recipes  (like Paella-Stuffed Squash and Spaghetti Squash Carbonara) and a nifty pancake trick from our October issue.

 

As the afternoon approached, the food truck began to serve lunch: grassfed angus beef burgers with applewood smoked bacon, sharp cheddar cheese, tomatoes and a jazzy sauce with a side of Belgian-style frites and garlic aioli.

 

 

There were tattoos, sunglasses and plenty of selfies, too.

 

Photo courtesy of Adrienne Longo Photography

But the fun didn’t stop there! We ended our day with an anniversary party at Toro to celebrate with Rachael and her friends. It was definitely a night to remember!

Rachael and our Editor in Chief, Lauren Purcell

Celebrity chefs Anne Burrell, Marc Murphy and Rachael Ray

 Photo courtesy of Adrienne Longo Photography

 

We’re going to be celebrating all month long — and we hope you’ll join us!   10 of Rachael’s chef pals created special burgers in her honor. You can get all of the recipes here.

 

 

Plus, the chefs will be serving their burgers at their restaurants for a limited time throughout the month! If you live near any of these eateries, be sure to stop by for one — or three!

The Pastry School Diaries: Bready, Set, Dough!

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Pastry & Baking Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences!

 

It was a short week of classes this week because of Columbus Day, and I was greeted on Tuesday night with our second midterm. While each final exam includes a written and practical element, the midterms are only written. It covered all of the bread baking basics, and I’m feeling quite confident about how I did!

 

The remainder of class was spent making and rolling out croissant dough (stay tuned for next week when we bake them!) and baking various types of brioche.

Pain au Raisin

Brioche loaf sprinkled with decorating sugar

Chocolate brioche loaf sprinkled with a mixture of granulated and light brown sugar

 

Although brioche and croissant baking is a fairly different process than that of regular breads, this entire unit has made me rethink my pastry career aspirations. In the beginning, I was so excited to learn–and fall in love with–the bread baking technique. I still am learning something new in every lesson, but while I originally imagined finishing this unit with an aspiration to open the next Balthazar, I am now starting to think my passion lies somewhere else. Maybe it’s in our third module, cakes, fillings and icings. Or maybe my passion lies in the basics, like custards, meringues and ice cream. Luckily, being only a third of the way through my program, I have plenty of time to decide!

 

Check back next week for a croissant update!

Find Out Where You Can Order One of Rach’s 10th Anniversary Burgers

What to get the girl who has everything? How about a burger created in her honor! To celebrate Rach’s 10 years in print, 10 of the country’s best cooks came up with tasty tributes that are the most fun you’ll have on a bun–so good, in fact, that the chefs are serving them at their restaurants, too! Find out where you can score one of these awesome burgers, or make them for yourself at home.

 

Spike Mendelsohn’s Double-Peppers & Onions Burger – Good Stuff Eatery in Washington, DC (Capitol Hill location), 10/13 to 10/31

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