Rachael Ray Every Day Staff

Inside Our Test Kitchen: Fake your own Bundt pan

So you want to bake some monkey bread or a Bundt cake, but don’t have the right kind of pan? You can create a makeshift one using what you already have in your kitchen. Piece of cake!

If you have a springform pan: Place a greased pint-size ovenproof jar (like a Mason or Bell jar) right side up in the center of the pan. Add the batter or dough and bake. Let cool about 10 minutes; remove the jar.

No springform? No problem! Two 9- or 10-inch cake pans will also work, but you’ll end up with two thinner Bundt cakes. Grease two small ramekins and put them upside down in the centers of the pans. Keep in mind that these cakes will cook more quickly, so start checking them sooner.

Ready to give it a go? Try these recipes!

Cinnamon-Bun Fun Monkey Bread Read more

Cheesy Apps That Go Great with Wine

Wine and cheese are a classic pairing for a good reason: Astringent items (like wine) and fatty foods (like cheese) balance each other on your tongue, making each flavor stand out more. Next time you’re having a party, tempt guests with savory bites loaded with goat cheese, Brie, Gorgonzola and more. You should probably plan to make seconds!

Grilled Cheese Triangles with Shallot Jam

Hot tip: You can make these grilled cheese sandwiches up to an hour ahead of time. Just heat in a 450 degree oven for 3 to 5 minutes to warm them through before serving. We won’t tell if you taste-test a few!

Fig & Gorgonzola Mini Tarts

Walnut-Crusted Goat Cheese with Rosemary Honey

Brie & Shaved Asparagus Toasts

Don’t feel like cooking? Don’t sweat it — everyone loves a cheeseboard! Follow @rachaelraymag on Instagram for inspiration to achieve all of your #CheeseBoardGoals.

Read more

How to Upgrade Your Office Lunch

Now that Labor Day Weekend’s over and everyone’s snapping out of lazy vacation mode, you might find yourself spending more time at the office to play catch-up. If you’re eating lunch at your desk more often than not these days, you’re not alone: sixty-two percent of office workers report that they 
typically eat lunch at their desks. But not every desk lunch has to be a #saddesklunch! Here’s how to give your midday meal a well-deserved promotion.

Fork it over — Give your meal 
a boost with silverware and a proper plate and bowl. In one study, people ate the same yogurt with 
a plastic spoon and 
a metal one, and rated it 15 percent tastier when eating with real flatware.

Play dress up — According to 
a survey by 
Bon Appétit Management (which operates cafés at companies and universities), 94 percent of millennials think customizing their meals is important. Make it easy to tweak your lunch with a stash of 
flavored olive oils and vinegars, 
or your favorite hot sauce.

Call a friend — Grab lunch with your coworkers—it might make you even better at your job. One recent study found that firefighters who ate together performed better than those who dined apart, 
an effect that also applies to those who wield Excel files instead of fire hoses, according to Kevin Kniffin, the study’s author. Eating with friends is more fun, too!

 

 

Ready for your lunch break? Try these cool recipes made from brand new supermarket products. The best part? You can whip ‘em up right in your breakroom!

Vietnamese Noodle Soup

Vietnamese Noodle Soup — Break 1 oz. thin rice noodles in half; place in 2-cup jar with a lid. Fill jar with boiling water; close lid. Let sit 20 minutes; drain. Add 1 1⁄2 cups Nona Lim’s Vietnamese Pho Broth ($6.99). Microwave, uncovered, until noodles are tender, about 2 minutes. Top with bean sprouts, halved 
sugar snap peas, shredded chicken, cilantro, mint and sriracha.

Sausage & Egg Toast – Microwave 2 Johnsonville Fully Cooked Breakfast Patties ($3.99) until hot, about 40 seconds. Crack an egg into a water-filled bowl. Microwave 1 minute, then cook in 15-second bursts until white is opaque, about 30 seconds more. Place egg and sausage on a toasted slice of Pepperidge Farm 3 Cheese Italian Bread ($3.99); season. Top with halved cherry tomatoes. 

Bacon 
Caesar Salad – Microwave 2 slices Al Fresco Uncured Chicken Bacon ($4.49) until crispy on the edges, about 1 1⁄2 minutes. 
Slice and toss with Elevate Sunny Caesar Salad ($4.49).

 

– By Cecily McAndrews and Grace Rasmus; Photography by Aaron Dyer

Inside Our Test Kitchen: DIY Jerk Seasoning

When you hear the word jerk—once you’ve determined nobody’s calling you one—you probably think of spicy Jamaican food. The hot-sweet flavor that’s associated with the Caribbean island is a bit of a catchall term: It refers to a dry rub, a paste, a marinade, a style of cooking and the ultimate Jamaican street food. In classic jerk cooking, meat (usually pork or chicken) is marinated in more than a dozen ingredients, including allspice, fiery Scotch bonnet peppers, thyme, black pepper and sugar. If you don’t have time to marinate, add a quick kick with a dry jerk seasoning blend. You can buy it at the market, but it’s easy to make at home. Rub it on meat, sprinkle it on grilled corn or add a pinch to chili. So don’t be bummed if you can’t make it to the Caribbean this Labor Day Weekend. Add some island flare to any nearly any protein with this DIY jerk seasoning recipe—even if you’re miles and miles away from the nearest island breeze.

Caribbean Jerk Chicken

DIY Jamaican Jerk Spice recipe:

Read more

Inside Our Test Kitchen: Get smart about syrup

Maple syrup (or lack thereof) can make or break a stack of pancakes, but not all syrups are the same. Letter grades (“A” or “B”) on labels didn’t make it clear what was inside the bottle, so to fix the sticky situation, the International Maple Syrup Institute suggested more specific categories. The new guidelines would reclassify pure maple syrup sold in the supermarket as Grade A and would include one of four descriptions: golden, amber, dark or very dark.

Golden syrup has a delicate flavor; try it for sweetening tea.

Try this: Sweet-Heat Iced Tea

Use maple-y amber for your short stack. Read more

Word of Mouth: The New Vegetable Cookbooks

If you rely on the same veg-centric cookbooks each summer, get produce inspo from this bumper crop of recent releases. Then, look out, farmers’ market!

If you like… Vegetable Literacy by Deborah Madison

You’ll love… The Vegetable Butcher: How to Select, Prep, Slice, Dice, and Masterfully Cook Vegetables from Artichokes to Zucchini by Cara Mangini

As the chef behind Little Eater in Columbus, OH, Cara Mangini wrangles veggies for a living. The more than 250 step-by-step photos in her book mirror the encyclopedic Vegetable Literacy, while sharing updated essential know-how for everything from cleaning sandy greens for creamed spinach crepes to prepping fresh artichokes for the grill.

If you like… Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen Read more

Inside Our Test Kitchen: The Best Way to Peel Hard-Boiled Eggs

In the never-ending quest for easy-to-peel hard-boiled eggs, our kitchen crew put three top techniques to the test to see which one was most, ahem, appealing. Check out the results below, along with tasty recipes you can make to test out the winning technique.

3RD PLACE:

Shake ‘Em Up

Place large eggs in a large saucepan (no more than will cover the bottom) and add enough water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to a boil; remove from heat. Cover; let stand 10 minutes. Drain. Cover the saucepan; shake the eggs until cracked all over. Run cold water into the pan until the eggs are cool, then peel under cold running water.

The results: The idea here is that the cold water slips between the white and the shell, making peeling easier. Shaking the cooked eggs in the pan cracked them quickly, but when it came to peeling, quite a bit of the white stuck to the shells.

Kale Cobb Salad  

2ND PLACE: Read more

Around the world in 5 skewers

Looking for cookout inspiration? There’s a whole universe of meat-on-a-stick out there! Take a global grilling tour and get fresh ideas for dinner, courtesy of these five skewered specialties.

Shish Kebab — This term has become the catch-all for grilled skewered food. The cross-cultural specialty is claimed by cuisines in South Asia, the Caucasus and Russia (where it’s called shashlik), the Balkans (cévak), the Middle East and beyond.

Try this: Kofta Kebabs with Herb Salad

Read more

Kitchen Cameo: Jesse Tyler Ferguson makes Chicken Tikka Masala

He serves up big laughs on Modern Family, but Jesse Tyler Ferguson is currently dishing out drama as a restaurant reservationist in the one-man Broadway play Fully Committed through July 31. He and Rach get along great on her show, so we challenged him to whip up one of her recipes. First things first, we asked him about his cooking cred.

Rachael Ray Every Day: On the spectrum of “I burn everything” to “I’m a master chef,” where do your skills fall?

Jesse Tyler Ferguson: “I’m closer to being able to run my own restaurant.”

RRED: What kinds of foods to you like?

JTF: “I love Mexican, Asian and Indian flavors. Spicy is always good!”

RRED: Do you like to entertain?

JTF: “I love cooking dinner and feeding friends and family. I love meals I can prep and leave alone while they cook to enjoy my company.” Read more

The Great Supermarket Grill-Off!

We like to consider ourselves the recipe experts, but we also give props where they’re due, and man, have supermarkets been upping their recipe game lately. For our Grocery Store Grill-Off story in the July/August 2016 issue, we scoped out the sites of several well-known grocery chains, and what we found surprised us—positively!—in scale (Whole Foods has almost 4,000 dishes!), quality (still talking about the Aldi burger we tried…), and creativity (I ended up watching Stop & Shop’s videos for fun).

In order to pick our favorite, though, it all came down to the food. To have a fair test, we picked a Greek burger from each.

Here are the contestants:

Read more