Every Day with Rachael Ray Staff

Even Better Butter

Brown butter may sound cheffy, but the deliciously nutty, super-simple sauce is easy to make: If you’ve got a pan and some butter, you’re 90 percent there! Make a big batch and store it in the fridge so it’s ready whenever you need a hit of extra-rich flavor. Then drizzle it over roasted vegetables or fish, toss it with pasta, or stir it into pancake batter. Ready to give it a shot? Here’s how!


Brown Butter and Brussels Sprouts Fettuccine


1. Cut the butter into half-inch-thick slices and melt over medium.

2. Leave the melted butter alone until it starts to bubble and foam, about 2 minutes.

3. Stir the butter until light-golden specks appear. (Those are the milk solids separating out from the fat and starting to toast.) As soon as the specks turn dark tan and the liquid is golden, remove the pan from the heat. Use immediately or pour into a glass jar and refrigerate.

Pizza Dough Do’s and Don’ts

Store-bought dough makes pizza night as easy as pie, but creating a great crust takes a little TLC. Here’s how to make restaurant-quality pizza at home every time.




Let the dough sit at room temp for 20 minutes so it can soften and roll more easily.

Roll it out with a rolling pin, working from the center to outside of the crust the edges. Or make a free-form pie by stretching the dough into shape.

Before you bake the pizza, brush the outside of the crust (the part that won’t get toppings) lightly with olive oil for a darker, crispy edge.



Resist rolling out the dough if it starts to spring back. Let it rest a few minutes and soften up so it stretches easily.

Don’t place the dough directly on the baking sheet. Instead, line the sheet with parchment or dust it with flour.

Be careful not to pile on too many ingredients or else you’ll end up with a soggy crust.



Now get to it! Click here for some of our most popular pizza recipes of all time.

DIY Chile Powder

Make your own chile powder for unbeatable, super-fresh flavor, using the chiles of your choice to get a heat level that’s right for you. Start with dried mild ancho chiles, medium chipotles, red-hot chiles de arbol–or a combination–then follow these three easy steps. Stir the powder into stews or salsas, rub it on meat before cooking or use it as a base for hcili (add ground cumin, garlic, cayenne and salt).


Elmo’s Famous Chili, from our September 2015 issue


1. Chop

Halve your dried chiles lengthwise, then remove the stems, ribs and seeds. Chop the chiles into small pieces


2. Toast

In a dry skillet, toast the chiles over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes per side.


3. Grind

Blend in a spice grinder to a powder. Store in a jar in a cool, dark place for up to six months.

A Look Inside Siena Farms

For our September issue, we had three chefs across the country take us behind the scenes at their farms. For the full story, pick up an issue today!

Most of the beautiful produce chef Ana Sortun cooks at her vegetable-centric Boston-area restaurants Oleana, Sofra and Sarma comes from 75-acre Siena Farms, which is across the street from her home in Sudbury, MA. Sortun’s husband, Chris Kurth, grew up on the farm and now runs it. It’s named after the couple’s 10-year-old daughter.




“Chris was working at a teaching farm, a place called the Farm School in Athol, MA, and he was looking for some restaurant accounts to work with—he was trying to sell us some spinach. Basically it was one of those love-at-first-sight things: I took the spinach and that was that.”



“Harvesting ingredients at
their moment has been huge. You know when the potatoes are just dug, they are much different than when they’ve been stored for a month. There are lessons I’ve learned by being around things growing, like the parts of the vegetable that aren’t super sexy—the stalks of Brussels sprouts or the leaves of broccoli—are actually really delicious. It’s pretty spectacular.“


MAKE THE DISH: Cheesy Squash Pupusas

A Look Inside Summerland Farm

For our September issue, we had three chefs across the country take us behind the scenes at their farms. For the full story, pick up an issue today!

In 1992, chef Anne Quatrano and her husband, chef Clifford Harrison, left the hustle of New York City’s restaurant kitchens for the small town of Cartersville, GA, where they started farming on a 60-acre property that’s been in Quatrano’s family for 175 years. It supplies all five of their Atlanta food businesses—including the James Beard Award–nominated Bacchanalia and gourmet shop-café Star Provisions—with produce and eggs.




“In the beginning, Clifford would come in to the restaurant after he’d taken care of the farm and then cook all night. Back then we had cows and goats that we milked and chickens we had for eggs, so there was a lot to do.”



“At times about 90 percent of our menus come from the farm, and we really celebrate that with our diners: ’Oh, this just came in!’ or ‘These are the first tomatoes of the season!’ It used to not seem as important to our guests as it was to us. But I think now it is.”


MAKE THE DISH: Spiced Carrots Two-Ways



A Look Inside La Provence Farm

For our September issue, we had three chefs across the country take us behind the scenes at their farms. For the full story, pick up an issue today!

In the salad days of his career, New Orleans chef John Besh worked at La Provence, a French- Mediterranean restaurant in Lacombe, LA, a town 26 miles northeast of New Orleans. Twelve years later, he came back and bought the restaurant, transforming three acres in its backyard into a small farm with veggies, herbs, chickens and fuzzy Mangalitsa pigs, a heritage breed known for its rich marbled meat.




“I purchased the business from one of my mentors, who had been influential in introducing me to the idea of local eating. He passed away just after I bought it, and I wanted to honor him by building this farm on the property. So before I cooked one dish, we started on the farm.”



“The figs that we grow, the Creole tomatoes—at one point we had about 20 varieties of tomatoes!— the special little lettuces that only grow a few weeks out of the year, these are the fun things—things that we originally had to ship in from around the country.”


MAKE THE DISH: Open-Face Salmon Sandwiches with Radishes & Cucumbers


Six Ways to Upgrade Chocolate Chip Cookies

Start with your favorite chocolate chip cookie dough (homemade or store-bought), then fun it up with these tasty mix-ins. Bake. Eat. Repeat!

Hot Stuff

Mix in cinnamon candies (such as Red Hots), ground cinnamon and a pinch of ground cayenne


Moroccan Spice

Mix in chopped dried apricots, chopped pistachios and a pinch of ground cardamom


Trail Mix

Mix in chopped roasted salted peanuts, dried cranberries and oatmeal


Movie Night

Mix in chocolate-covered raisins and peanut butter candies (such as Reese’s Pieces)


Big on Figs

Mix in chopped dried figs, sesame seeds (any color) and orange zest


Tropical Fruit

Mix in chopped dried pineapple, coconut flakes and chopped macadamia nuts


Are you following us on Instagram? We’re featuring a cookie a day all month long! Join in on the fun by tagging your cookie pics with #RRMagFan. We may even regram you!

Behind the Scenes with Elmo!

It was all laughs while on set for the Cook with Kids story in our September issue. For such a giant personality, Elmo is one teeny little guy—in person, he’s only about three feet tall! Which makes sense, of course: Elmo is only 3 1/2 years old.



His diminutive size doesn’t detract from his star power, though. On set, Harper, age 7, our pint-sized co-chef, was by far the closest person to the Sesame Street demographic, but the adults on set were lining up to take pictures. Heck, we might have been more excited to meet him!


From left: Associate Art Director Elizabeth Zuhl, Food Editor Cecily McAndrews, Elmo and Photo Director, Kim Gougenheim


Lucky for us, he’s just as sweet and accommodating as he looks. And he’s a great cook, too! Being so young, he stayed away from knives and hot surfaces, but he was game for brushing the baking sheet, measuring spices, and, of course, taste-testing.

If you’d like to d some taste-testing (and of course you do!), check out Elmo’s Famous Chili recipe here or in the September issue of Every Day with Rachael Ray (on newsstands August 4th!).


By Cecily McAndrews

America’s Best Snow Cones

One of your favorite childhood fixtures has officially grown up: Snow cones are now appearing at restaurants, bars and food trucks–complete with local ingredients, artisanal syrups and the occasional splash of booze. Time to explore the next ice age!

Brabo Restaurant in Arlington, VA, serves up the kickin’ Old Town Ginger snow cone, a refreshing blend of kaffir lime vodka, ginger beer syrup, mint liqueur and ice chunks, all of it topped with lime zest and chili flakes. braborestaurant.com


At the Imperial Woodpecker Sno-Balls shop in New Orleans, the specialty is made with light-as-air shaved ice (versus the ground kind you’re used to) and crowned with house-made syrups such as watermelon-jalapeño and cardamom cream. iwsnoballs.com


Kauai’s Uncle’s Shave Ice serves up shave snow, a Hawaiian take on a Taiwanese treat that starts as a frozen block of water, milk and syrup (try the Asia-inspired lychee or dried plum), then gets shaved into creamy ribbons. uncleskauai.com


 Sno con Amor at L.A.’s Hollywood Farmers’ Market fancies up raspados (Mexico’s answer to the snow cone, served in a cup) with handmade syrups. Two faves: lime-mint and grapefruit juice with vanilla bean. snoconamor.com


In true Bay Area style, Oakland’s Skylite Snowballs makes nearly everything from scratch with local farm fare. The result? Seasonal syrups–from pluot to lemon-ginger–poured over crunchy ice and served from a truck. skylitesnowballs.com



By Jenna Scatena

Host Your Own Backyard Clam Bake!

No beach? No problem! Here’s how chef Ben Ford builds a classic seafood feast on the grill.


Serves 4     Prep 20 min     Cook 50 min

2 live lobsters (about 1 1/2 lbs. each)

4 medium artichokes

4 ears corn

3 sticks butter–1 softened, 2 melted

4 sweet onions, peeled

5 lbs. rockweed seaweed

9 small potatoes

1 lb. fresh Mexican chorizo links

12 unpeeled, deveined jumbo shrimp, preferably head-on

2 1/4 lbs. littleneck clams, scrubbed


1. Heat a charcoal or gas grill to high. Place the lobsters in the freezer for 20 minutes. Trim the artichoke stems and leaves; slice off the top inch. In a pot, steam artichokes in 1 inch boiling water until crisp-tender, 20 minutes.

2. Pull back the cornhusks and remove silk. Rub each cob with 2 tbsp. softened butter. Pull husks back up to cover corn; tie with kitchen twine.

3. Using a chef’s knife, make two slits in the core end of the onions about a quarter way through, forming an X.

4. Lay half the seaweed on the top grill grate. Arrange the lobsters in the center of the seaweed, then surround with the artichokes, corn, onions, 8 potatoes and the chorizo links. Scatter the shrimp and clams on top; cover with the remaining seaweed. Place the remaining potato on top as a tester. Cover the clambake with the grill lid.

5. Cook until the tester potato is tender, about 30 minutes. Serve with the melted butter.


Adapted from Taming the Feast by Ben Ford and Carolynn Carreño, Atria Books, 2014