Rachael Ray Every Day Staff

DIY Mother’s Day spa treatments

Pamper Mom (especially if that’s you!) with spa treatments from your kitchen. They’re even better than breakfast in bed for giving her an ahhh-some Mother’s Day!

 

Chocolate & Strawberry Scrub

Berries and cocoa are high in skin-protecting antioxidants, and coarse sugar gently exfoliates, says Philip Berkovitz, food beauty guru and founder of Philip B Botanical Products.

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What to do with leftover Easter eggs

Gather those extra Easter eggs and get cracking with these fun, easy recipes.

Bread-and-Butter Pickled Eggs

Once you’ve polished off a 24-oz. jar of bread-and-butter pickles, add 4 peeled hard-boiled eggs 3 sprigs dill and 2 bay leaves to the liquid in the jar. Refrigerate overnight. Makes 4.

Deviled Egg Dip

In a food processor, blend 6 hard-boiled eggs, 6 tbsp. mayo, 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice, 1/4 tsp. garlic powder and hot sauce to taste; season. Sprinkle with paprika. Serve with raw veggies. Makes 1 1/4 cups.

Egg & Smoked Salmon Pasta

Cook 1 lb. fettuccini; drain and reserve 3/4 cup pasta cooking water. In a pot, melt 8 oz. cream cheese, 2 tbsp. grated Parmesan and 1/2 tsp. Dijon. Stir in pasta, cooking water and 6 oz. chopped smoked salmon. Top with capers, chives and 3 grated hard-boiled eggs. Serves 6.

Breakfast Scotch Eggs

Shape 1 lb. bulk breakfast sausage into 6 thin patties; place 1 hard-boiled egg on each. Press sausage around egg to cover. Roll in flour, dip in beaten egg and coat with panko. Bake at 400 degrees until sausage is cooked through, 45 minutes. Makes 6.

By Ananda Eidelstein

6 reasons to shop generic

‘Nduja and basil pasta sauce, organic kale and vegetable salsa, pine nut-topped hummus: they sound like they come from a very fancy lunch spot, but they’re actually all examples of amazing store-brand products featured in the April edition of Checkout. I love a bargain as much as the next person, which is why I usually opt for generic canned goods; even so, I was amazed at the quality of the products we tried. And we tried a lot—dozens, in fact—ranging from drinks to snacks to full meals and appetizers.

 

Kroger HemisFares Fiery ‘Nduja and Basil Pasta Sauce ($4.49 for 15 oz.)

Sprouts Organic Kale & Vegetable Salsa ($2.99 for 16 oz.)

 

Aldi Little Salad Bar Pine Nut Hummus ($1.99 for 10 oz.)

I shouldn’t have been surprised. Mintel published a study that said 63% of consumers think store brands are more innovative than they used to be. Judging from my consumption of Trader Joe’s Cookie Butter Sandwich Cookies, I think it’s true.

 

Trader Joe’s Cookie Butter Sandwich Cookies ($3.99 for 18)

Whole Foods Market Potato & Pea Samosas ($2.69 for 8)


Target’s Beekman 1802 Farm Pantry Ploughing the Earth Granola ($4.99 for 10 oz.)

 

Check out why our editors chose these 6 products in the April issue, or scope out our totally adorable video on Instagram. What are your favorite store brands? Tell us in the comments!

 

By Cecily McAndrews

Use your grater for so much more than just cheese

Before there was the food processor, before there was the mandoline, there was the box grater. This workhorse of the Rachael Ray Every Day test kitchen can perform basic shredding duties, but it also excels at some less expected culinary tasks.

 

Tomaotes

Grate a fresh tomato on the largest holes of a box grater for a fast and easy fresh tomato sauce. The pulp goes in the bowl, but the skin doesn’t!

 

Day-old bread

Got day-old crusty bread? Don’t toss it! Grate it on the medium holes of a box grater for easy breadcrumbs.

 

Pistachios

Pistachios are pricey, but tasty, and a gorgeous shade of green. Make the most of them by using the smallest holes of a box grater (we tested it—no boo-boos!) to finely grate the nuts over fish or pasta

10 New & Improved Easter Egg Ideas

Break out of your shell! Use odds and ends from your kitchen to decorate this year’s Easter eggs.

 

TAKE COVER

Re-create the mesmerizing look of sprinkle-topped ice cream cones—on an egg! Use a paintbrush to coat half the egg with multipurpose glue and roll the glue- covered area in a shallow bowl filled with rainbow nonpareils or sanding sugar. Let dry; repeat with remaining half.

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Behind the Scenes: On Set with Food52

 

To anyone who’s ever scrolled through the Food52 site, or drooled over their gorgeously minimalist Instagram feed, the Food52 offices feel strangely familiar. Decorated in neutral colors with beautiful details (subway tile, bead board, leather chairs) and filled with natural light, it’s a pretty dreamy workspace. And this was before we even saw the bar!

 

No, really, check out this bar!

 

Elegant yet comfy, interesting but accessible, and, above all, fun: This is the aesthetic that Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, co-founders of the site, cultivate on Food52 and in their office—and it makes total sense once you meet these culinary besties.

 

They finish each other’s sentences, poke fun at their habits (both detest super-loud restaurants), and trust each other on matters great and small—for instance, Hesser checked her makeup in the mirror, but waited until Stubbs said it looked good before heading on set.

 

Their mission these days? To make it easier for people to eat good, interesting food, even on weeknights.

 

In their story in the April issue of Rachael Ray Every Day and in their latest book, A New Way to Dinner, they outline their make-ahead strategies to eat well on busy nights without going crazy. Says Stubbs, “cooking this way is so much more efficient, so you can focus on the important things.”

 

With scrumptious recipes like Spaghetti with Make-Ahead Meatballs, Salad with Creamy Anchovy Dressing and Rhubarb Shortcakes, it won’t take much convincing.

 

Pick up the issue to learn more, and to score a discount code for 20 percent off kitchenware from their online store!

 

By Cecily McAndrews

6 Twists on Gremolata

Gremolata might sound fancy, but the Italian herb mix is simply fresh parsley, garlic and lemon zest finely chopped together—kind of like pesto and even easier to make. The fragrant condiment is traditionally sprinkled on rich osso buco, aka braised veal shanks, but it can brighten up all kinds of dishes, from pasta to fish to roast chicken. You can start with our classic recipe, or try these fun riffs. They’re an easy way to add a fresh zing to all kinds of dishes—even sweet ones.

 

Try classic gremolata on Garlic Chicken with Red Onion & Toasted Bread

 

Green-olata

Chop it up

Lime zest

Cilantro

Minced jalapeño

Sprinkle it on

Tacos, guacamole or any Tex-Mex dish

 

Gremolata Piccata

Chop it up

Orange zest

Chopped capers

Minced basil

Sprinkle it on

Grilled fish, roasted vegetables, grilled chicken breasts

 

The Californian

Chop it up

Meyer lemon zest

Minced radish

Minced chives

Sprinkle it on

Deviled eggs, seared steak, salad greens

 

Main Squeeze

Chop it up

Orange zest

Minced green olives

Minced garlic

Sprinkle it on

Roasted cauliflower, couscous, chicken cutlets

 

Dessert-olata

Chop it up

Grapefruit zest

Minced crystallized ginger

Minced mint

Sprinkle it on

Toasted pound cake, lemon sorbet, Greek yogurt

Behind the scenes: Rach’s acting debut!

Rachael is used to being in front of the camera (after all, she’s been hosting TV shows for more than 10 years), but she recently got to try out her acting chops while guest staring—as herself—on Freeform’s Young & Hungry. Of course, she was a total natural!


Photo courtesy of David M. Russell/The Rachael Ray Show

The segment, filmed at Rach’s studio, featured characters Gabi and Sofia (played by Emily Osment and Aimee Carrero), who were on the show to promote their just-launched food truck in San Francisco. We got to watch in amazement as Rach came out and nailed her lines—on the first take. She didn’t even have to carry her script around for backup! And she improvised a little, taking cover behind a stove when Gabi went nuts over some nuts (you’ll understand when you see the episode).

Photo courtesy of David M. Russell/The Rachael Ray Show

 

Because the show’s stars were on Rach’s turf, she treated them to her over-the-top green room treats. “She personally delivered pork bahn mi sandwiches and peanut cabbage salad,” gushed Osment. “It was the best,” Carrero agreed, pointing out that the best they can usually hope for is a deli plate of meat and cheese.  

Photo courtesy of David M. Russell/The Rachael Ray Show

Catch Rach on Young & Hungry on March 9 at 8 PM EST.

 

By Lisa Freedman

How to Host Happy Hour for Less

Be your own bartender with a top-notch, five-bottle home bar that lets you make pretty much any popular cocktail and costs only $100. We’ll drink to that!

 

Five spirits experts share the bottles that deliver the best bang for your Benjamin. Try these pro picks to make your living room the best bar in town!

Rum

Plantation 3 Stars White Rum ($18 for 750 ml)

“This is one of my favorite white rums for any budget. An aged blend of Caribbean rums, it adds hints of tropical fruit to any drink, especially a daiquiri.” —Blair Reynolds, owner of bar and restaurant Hale Pele in Portland, OR 

Another great pick

Boozy Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum will wake up a mai tai—or any tiki drink. ($19 for 750 ml)

 

Gin

Citadelle Gin ($25 for 750 ml)

“Leave it to the French to come up with a delightfully flavorful gin. (No wonder: it’s made with nearly 20 herbs, roots, spices and flowers.) It pairs particularly well with citrus. One Tom Collins, please.” —Paul Clarke, author of The Cocktail Chronicles 

Another great pick 

Juniper-heavy Gordon’s London Dry Gin is a steal, and ideal in a gin and tonic. ($13 for 750 ml)

 

Tequila

Pueblo Viejo Blanco ($18 for 750 ml)

“This blanco tequila (which isn’t aged) is distilled in a traditional way. It has a citrusy, earthy flavor that shines in a margarita.” —Courtenay Greenleaf, corporate beverage director at Rosa Mexicano restaurants 

Another great pick 

Spicy Cimarrón Blanco offers fresh agave flavor. ($20 for 750 ml)

 

Vodka

Tito’s Handmade Vodka ($21 for 750 ml)

“Corn-based Tito’s is one of the most bright- tasting, clean vodkas around—which is why it’s so delicious on the rocks or in a martini. I also love that it’s from Austin, my hometown.” —Christina Cabrera, bar consultant at San Francisco’s Barbarossa Lounge 

Another great pick

Crisp Gruven Handcrafted Vodka, made from wheat and rye, is a cocktail go-to. ($11 for 750 ml)

 

Bourbon

W. L. Weller Special Reserve ($18 for 750 ml)

“I don’t make cocktails with anything I wouldn’t drink on its own. This bourbon has a sophisticated sweetness balanced by a fiery kick, which makes it great neat and in a mixed drink.” —Michael Neff, bar director at NYC’s Holiday Cocktail Lounge 

Another great pick 

Aged in charred oak barrels, Jim Beam Black is just as complex as pricier bourbons. ($22 for 750 ml)

 

By Joshua M. Bernstein; Photography by Aaron Dyer

 

How to Make a Coconutty Bunny Cake

When Rachael and her older sister, Maria, were growing up in Upstate New York, Easter was full of sweet surprises. Their grandfather would arrive bearing 4-foot-tall hollow chocolate eggs filled with Italian Easter candies. Dozens of family and friends would gather at their house for a ham or lamb feast prepared by their mom, Elsa, followed by a fun dessert, like this adorable bunny cake. These days, Maria is the family baker. She’s made pony, lizard and ladybug cakes for her kids’ birthday parties, but the bunny cake, which she learned to make alongside her mom, is still her favorite. “It feels like home,” she says. “It’s familiar and comforting and reminds me of all of those good times.”

 

Photography by Will Styer. Food styling by Maria Del Mar Sacasa. Prop styling by Sarah Guido-Laakso

 

 

Coconutty Bunny Cake

Serves 12

Prep 25 min

Bake 30 min

Assembly 30 min

 

Cake

3 3/4 cups cake flour

2 1/2 cups sugar

2 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. baking soda

1 1/2 cups buttermilk, at room temperature

2 sticks butter, melted and cooled slightly

9 large egg yolks

5 tbsp. vegetable oil

1 tbsp. pure vanilla extract

4 large egg whites

3/4 cup rainbow sprinkles

 

Frosting

3 sticks butter, at room temperature

5 3⁄4 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted

1⁄4 cup whole milk, plus more as needed

1 tbsp. plus 11⁄2 tsp. pure vanilla extract

 

1. Position racks in the top and bottom thirds of the oven; preheat to 350° for light pans and 325° for dark pans. Grease and flour three 8-inch cake pans.

2. In a large bowl, whisk the flour, 2 cups sugar, the baking powder, salt and baking soda. In a medium bowl, whisk the buttermilk, butter, yolks, oil and vanilla. (If you really like coconut flavor, use 1 tsp. coconut extract and 1 tsp. vanilla extract.)

3. In a medium bowl using an electric mixer on high, beat the egg whites until very soft peaks form, about 2 minutes. Gradually beat in the remaining 1/2 cup sugar; beat until stiff, glossy peaks form.

4. Using an electric mixer on medium, gradually beat the buttermilk mixture into the flour mixture just to blend. Using a rubber spatula, fold half the egg-white mixture into the batter until almost blended. Fold in the remaining egg-white mixture and the sprinkles. Divide the batter among the pans.

5. Bake the cakes, switching the pans between the top and bottom racks halfway through, until a toothpick inserted into the centers comes out clean, about 30 minutes. Let cool in the pans on a wire rack, about 15 minutes. If needed, run a thin knife around the edges of the pans to release the cakes, then invert onto the rack and let cool completely.

6. For the frosting, in a large bowl using an electric mixer on medium, beat the butter until smooth. Add the sugar, 1 cup at a time, mixing to blend between additions. Beat in 1/4 cup milk and the vanilla. Increase the speed to medium-high; beat, adding milk by the tablespoon if too thick, until smooth and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Assemble and frost the cake as shown here.