Mama Mia! Rachael Ray’s New Cookbook is Almost Out!

Asking us to choose our favorite Rachael Ray cookbook is like asking us to choose our favorite kid, but Rach’s newest one, Everyone is Italian on Sunday, has already won us over big time. In fact, there weren’t enough office copies to go around, so a lot of us ordered our own. (You can pre-order your own copy now; it comes out officially on October 27.)

Rachael says this is her most personal book yet. She shares all the recipes that are near and dear to her heart: classic baked pastas she ate growing up, her husband John’s Italian ingredient-inspired cocktails, dishes you’ll want to make for company and of course, a few burgers scattered throughout. We’re already making plans to cook up Carbonara with Artichokes, Lemon Risotto and Ricotta Cheesecake.


Want to be one of the first to get your hands on a copy? Click here to pre-order the book today. You’ll be cooking your way to Italy in no time.

The 2nd Annual Pizza Month Meal Planner

Here at Every Day with Rachael Ray, we really love pizza. And since October is National Pizza Month, we really love October! Last year, we gave you five delicious pizza-inspired recipes that you could make during the week, and we’re back for a second year with new recipes to whet your whistle. So get ready for a week full of crust, sauce and cheese. And if that’s not enough for you, we’ve got dozens more recipes on our site.


Monday, October 5

Broccoli Rabe Pizza Bread

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The Pastry School Diaries: The Best-Kept Secrets of Bread Baking

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Baking & Pastry Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences!

One of the best parts about having a renowned bread baker as your bread unit instructor? Besides his world of knowledge and years of experience, he has an unending supply of tips that you won’t find in any cookbook. Every day as I come into class, I can expect to learn something new about the art of bread baking, and not just about the technique. Whether it’s a secret last step to making perfectly textured dough or a traditional British recipe that differs from its American counterpart, Chef Sim has shared a wealth of information that has infinitely improved my creations. And now I can share that information with you!



Tip 1: Bake your bread until the crust is extremely dark

It may even look burnt in some places, but trust me, it’s not. As “The Prince of Darkness” has taught us, a darker crust enables a deeper flavor all the way though the bread. Your crust should have a full ombre effect of coloring–from very dark to golden brown. His bread is the real deal.


Tip 2: Don’t add butter or oil to your focaccia dough

Doing so only inhibits the gluten and rising process. Instead, coat both sides of your dough in olive oil and bake it on a sheet pan. This will create a crispy, buttery crust and leave the inside of the bread light and airy.


Tip 3: When making focaccia, ice water is your best friend

Just before baking your dough, dip your fingers in ice water. Make impressions with your fingers in the dough. Repeat twice. I think some sort of magic happens, but the dough bakes up beautifully light with lots of holes. Just the way you want it.


Tip 4: When it comes to making cinnamon rolls, less is more!

This week we made Chelsea Buns, which are quite similar to a cinnamon rolls, except the filling is a mixture of cinnamon, brown sugar and currants. Rather than glazing them with a thick icing how we do in the states, the British recipe simply calls for a generous sprinkling of sugar. And let me tell you, on pastry this good, no icing necessary!


I hope you’ve taken away a tip or two that can be helpful in your home baking! Check back next week for more fun tips and tricks.

Even Better Butter

Brown butter may sound cheffy, but the deliciously nutty, super-simple sauce is easy to make: If you’ve got a pan and some butter, you’re 90 percent there! Make a big batch and store it in the fridge so it’s ready whenever you need a hit of extra-rich flavor. Then drizzle it over roasted vegetables or fish, toss it with pasta, or stir it into pancake batter. Ready to give it a shot? Here’s how!


Brown Butter and Brussels Sprouts Fettuccine


1. Cut the butter into half-inch-thick slices and melt over medium.

2. Leave the melted butter alone until it starts to bubble and foam, about 2 minutes.

3. Stir the butter until light-golden specks appear. (Those are the milk solids separating out from the fat and starting to toast.) As soon as the specks turn dark tan and the liquid is golden, remove the pan from the heat. Use immediately or pour into a glass jar and refrigerate.

The Pastry School Diaries: Rising to the Occasion

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Baking & Pastry Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences!


I was excited to start our bread unit for various reasons: for the variety (sweet! savory! croissants! pizza!), the experience (I’ve never made bread before) and of course, for that amazing aroma of a freshly baked loaf. We’re only two days in, but my expectations have already been exceeded. We’ve baked four different types of bread in seven different shapes, I’ve learned about different yeast and rising methods and I’ve taken home more bread than I know what to do with. The cherry on top? I’m learning from the best of the best, Chef Sim Cass, dean of the bread baking program at ICE and founding baker of Balthazar Bakery.


On our first day, we made a one-step bread, which means you don’t need to let the yeast ferment overnight. You simply add it to warm water, add your flours and salt, mix it, knead it, let it rise and bake it. The end product is a light, fluffy and super flavorful French loaf.


Whole wheated French rolls


We also made a starter, which is a a fermented mix of flour, water and yeast that you add to the dough you’re making. This causes the dough to ferment, and fermentation equals flavor! Some bakers have had the same starter for years (Balthazar’s has had theirs for 38!). Our starter was only a day old but it still imparted tons of flavor into the finished product. Imagine what a few more decades could do!


Whole wheated farmhouse bread with pecans and raisins


A sliced walnut loaf to share with the office


It’s a good time to be one of my co-workers! Check back next week for more bread goodness.

Pizza Dough Do’s and Don’ts

Store-bought dough makes pizza night as easy as pie, but creating a great crust takes a little TLC. Here’s how to make restaurant-quality pizza at home every time.




Let the dough sit at room temp for 20 minutes so it can soften and roll more easily.

Roll it out with a rolling pin, working from the center to outside of the crust the edges. Or make a free-form pie by stretching the dough into shape.

Before you bake the pizza, brush the outside of the crust (the part that won’t get toppings) lightly with olive oil for a darker, crispy edge.



Resist rolling out the dough if it starts to spring back. Let it rest a few minutes and soften up so it stretches easily.

Don’t place the dough directly on the baking sheet. Instead, line the sheet with parchment or dust it with flour.

Be careful not to pile on too many ingredients or else you’ll end up with a soggy crust.



Now get to it! Click here for some of our most popular pizza recipes of all time.

The Pastry School Diaries: Life Outside the Classroom

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Baking & Pastry Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences!


One of the reasons I chose to attend ICE over other culinary schools in the city was because of their externship requirement after classes ended. For nine months, I’m learning, executing, studying and creating in the comfort of my classroom, but when my 100th lesson (yep, 100!) comes to an end, I’ll be expected to work in a bakery, restaurant or specialty shop for 210 hours–either on the weekends, before or after work at the magazine–to demonstrate all that I’ve learned.


It was a short week this week due to Rosh Hashanah, and our only class on Tuesday was dedicated to learning about the externship process from our career advisor. She explained that before we choose an externship site, we are expected to trail, or interview, at a few locations. We will visit various bakeries and restaurants, work an entire shift and decide if the environment is a good fit. She asked us to start thinking about the type of place we’d like to work: a large restaurant kitchen, a small independent bakery, a bread shop, a cake shop–the list goes on. While I’m still not quite sure where I want to focus and hone my skills, I’m leaning more towards a specialty shop, like an ice cream shop or small bread bakery. What I do know is that by the time I have to choose, I’ll have enough experience in the kitchen to really understand where my skills and passions lie.


Where would you want to extern as a pastry student?


Doughn’t forget to check back next week for an update on our bread unit (see what I did there!).



DIY Chile Powder

Make your own chile powder for unbeatable, super-fresh flavor, using the chiles of your choice to get a heat level that’s right for you. Start with dried mild ancho chiles, medium chipotles, red-hot chiles de arbol–or a combination–then follow these three easy steps. Stir the powder into stews or salsas, rub it on meat before cooking or use it as a base for hcili (add ground cumin, garlic, cayenne and salt).


Elmo’s Famous Chili, from our September 2015 issue


1. Chop

Halve your dried chiles lengthwise, then remove the stems, ribs and seeds. Chop the chiles into small pieces


2. Toast

In a dry skillet, toast the chiles over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes per side.


3. Grind

Blend in a spice grinder to a powder. Store in a jar in a cool, dark place for up to six months.

The Pastry School Diaries: Bake It ‘Til You Make It

Editorial Assistant Lauren Katz is enrolled in the part-time Baking & Pastry Arts program at New York City’s Institute of Culinary Education. Follow her each week as she shares her sweet experiences!


As if recovering from Labor Day weekend wasn’t a feat of its own, I was promptly greeted Tuesday night by my first of four pastry school final exams. Luckily, I spent the long weekend practicing my creme anglaise and souffle skills, prepared to (hopefully) nail the recipes when put to the test.
This is the first time I’ve had to study for a test since college, and although that was only two and a half years ago, I knew my study skills were a little rusty. I’ll spare you the details of the written exam itself and skip right to the final result: an A! I am not usually one who performs well under pressure, and admittedly, I didn’t perform my best– the creme anglaise was slightly undercooked and my souffles looked less than perfect. But being put to the test for the first time by myself (we always work in teams of 2 during class) showed me the importance of having confidence in the kitchen. I kept doubting myself, and it was apparent in my work. Luckily, my souffles were perfectly cooked and still tasted delicious, so I was only penalized for presentation. For anyone interested in trying their hand at souffle at home, here are my personal tips to making it successfully:
1. Find a recipe that calls for as little liquid as possible. The more liquid, the harder it is to keep the souffle light and fluffy.

2. Gently fold in your egg whites just until they are incorporated. Over mixing the batter is a surefire way result in a cracked souffle.

3. Fill your ramekins alllllll the way to the tippy top. This way, your souffle can begin to rise above the ramekin, and you won’t have to worry about the vessel interfering with the batter.

4. Try not to open the oven to check on your souffles. Doing so interrupts the heat distribution and lets cold air in.

5. When all else fails, it’ll still taste good. Like my exam proved, even though they didn’t look the prettiest, I still received a good grade for the taste and degree of doneness.


Before I mentally prepare for Module 2, which includes breads and pastry doughs, I’ll share some of my favorite lessons and recipes from Module 1:


One of the first things we ever made, blueberry muffins


The most delicious apple crumbles


Dacquoise, layers of almond cookies and meringue frosting


And a class field trip to Odd Fellows Ice Cream Co., which included a sampling of every flavor on the menu and this cornbread sundae. Yum-O!

Check back next week for another dessert adventure!

Fun Ways to Sneak Fruit Into Your Dinner

If you thought getting your family to eat their veggies was hard, adding fruit to the mix may sound even harder– until now. We’ve got some fun, delicious and family-friendly dinner recipes that use fruit in a seamless way. These dishes are nutrient-packed and super colorful. A party on your plate!

Chicken Francese with Grapefruit-Tarragon Sauce


Baby Porchetta with Balsamic Berries and Arugula


Beef & Mango Tostadas


Peachy Grilled Cheese Sandwiches


Pork Chops with Grapes